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  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews The Fuji REAL 3D W3

    Posted on March 22nd, 2011 Staff Writer

    With 3D coming on stronger than ever these days we figure we would bring a review of a nice little 3D camera by Fuji. The W3 isn’t Fuji’s first 3D camera, as the first model didn’t get such a hot reception. This camera is smaller and lighter than the original model with a bigger and better quality screen. The new Fuji W3 adds 3D HD video recording with stereo audio to the formula and the unique ability to shoot video in Real 3D in High Definition, with live or recorded playback via direct connection to any 3D TV.

    The camera’s dual 1/2.3-inch, 10 megapixel CCDs and 3X zoom lenses are carried over from before, but a new design and more user-friendly interface is a great improvement.  The 3D printing technology is ingenious. The Fuji W3 continues the strategy of offering Real 3D content by replicating the human visual system in combining two high quality lens and two CCDs in the one chassis – and allows consumers the option of viewing 3D images and video either with or without special glasses.  It uses a very fine-textured Fresnel lens surface on a thin plastic sheet to produce an auto stereoscopic image.

    Images can also be made into special ‘lenticular’ prints – via a unique printing process. The camera will capture 720p 3D movies and can save both 3D MPO images and 2D JPEGs simultaneously. If you haven’t checked this camera out I would say do it as soon as you can.

    Key features:

    • 3D HD Movie (720p) and 3D still image capture
    • Instant 3D playback on build-in High Contrast, 3.5” 3D LCD (without the need for special 3D glasses)
    • Direct Connection via HDMI high-speed 1.4(Type A-Type C) cable to any branded 3D HDTV
    • Two 1/2.3” 10 Megapixel CCD
    • Two Fujinon 3x optical zoom lens
    • 3D RP(REAL PHOTO) HD PROCESSOR
    • Compact and light-weight 230g body (excluding accessories, battery and memory card)
    • 2D Special effects using Simultaneous Shooting functions
  • Explaining Aperture In Photography

    Posted on March 19th, 2011 Staff Writer

    When you purchase your digital camera if you are like me you pick up the manual and start thumbing through it. You might also come across somewhere in that manual that talks about ‘aperture’. If you are new to photography you might actually ask what aperture is in relationship to your camera. We are going to explain aperture in this article for you and hope it give you a better understanding.

    The main function of a camera lens is to collect light. The size of the diaphragm opening in a camera lens allows light to pass through onto the film inside the camera the moment when the shutter curtain in camera opens during an exposure process. The larger the diameter of the aperture, then more light reaches the image sensor. Aperture is expressed as f-numbers or f-stops. Those numbers you see on the lens like f22 or f/22 or f/8.0 and f/5.6. The smaller the F-stop number, the larger the lens opening on your camera.  A “fast” lens is one that has a large maximum aperture like F2.4 or F2.0.

    A good aperture range is my opinion is somewhere between F1.8 and F16. A larger aperture range will give you more latitude with the kinds of pictures you can shoot. The larger the aperture the better your camera will perform in low light situations and will help negate camera shake. A larger aperture also allows you to use a fast shutter speed for freeze action. Another advantage of a large maximum aperture is to provide a shallow depth of field. This allows the background to blur nicely thus isolating your subject.  A smaller aperture also has its good qualities by using a slow shutter speed which can help show objects in motion.  Another advantage of a small minimum aperture is to increase the depth-of-field. An increased depth-of-field allows you to take landscape pictures where as much of the picture in the foreground and reaching all the way to the background.

    We hope this short article on aperture for digital cameras has helped give you a better understanding.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews The Casio EX-FH20

    Posted on March 6th, 2011 Staff Writer

    The Casio EX-FH20 is the next in line to the FX1, released in early 2008. It’s smaller, lighter, and less expensive as a 9 megapixel camera. The FH20 still offers awesome velocity at 40 frames per second continuous shooting and 1000 fps high speed movie mode. The 9.1 megapixel, CMOS-sensor equipped EX-FH20 meets or exceeds the definition of an ultrazoom camera. The Casio EX-FH20 has a simplified user interface, a significantly lower price tag, a smaller and lighter overall package. The FH20 has the same smaller 1/2.3-inch 9.1-megapixel CMOS as the FC100. It also has a completely different lens. Casio has built memory into the EX-FH20, instead of bundling a memory card. There’s just under 32MB of onboard memory on the FH20, so you will probably want to purchase a larger memory card right away. The EX-FH20 uses four AA batteries for power. They also include a lens cap and retaining strap to protect your lens from harm. It fits tightly which is a good thing.

    What else is included?

    • The 9.1 Megapixel Exilim EX-FH20 digital camera
    • Four AA alkaline batteries
    • Lens cap w/retaining strap
    • Shoulder strap
    • USB cable
    • A/V cable
    • CD-ROM featuring YouTube Uploader, Adobe Reader, and camera manual
    • 33 page Basic Reference Manual + full manual (on CD-ROM)

    This camera is by far and away the most affordable high-speed consumer camera around.