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  • Cycling Photography Tips

    Posted on October 31st, 2011 Staff Writer

    Cycling photography can be challenging but with the right tips and know how it also can be fun. We will give few tips in this article to get you started.

    Using Your Flash – Use your flash when shooting cyclists. The reason for this is the sun will cast shadows on the face and bodies of the riders. This will fill those shadows with light which in turn will create more dynamic images.

    Shutter Speed –Choosing the right shutter speed can have a great affect on your shots. For stop action use a shutter speed that is 1/250 of a second or faster. You might have an automatic setting; usually a sport setting that will take care of this for you.  As cyclists pass follow the riders with your camera. The combination of panning and slow shutter speed keeps the cyclist in focus while blurring the background.

    Angles – Shoot high and low, in other words shoot from low points and high points. Get those different images that people aren’t use to seeing.

    Practice – These days it’s not near as hard to become good at cycling and sports photography due to the digital camera era. The more time you put in to your photos the better your results will be. You will learn what settings work and what settings don’t.

    Thanks for stopping by the 42nd Street Photo blog and we hope to see you again soon.

  • Digital Camera Memory Types

    Posted on October 17th, 2011 Staff Writer

    If you own a digital camera or cameras then you probably know about the different types of memory involved. There are multiple types of memory cards and depending on the type of camera you own you need to know which type is right for your model of camera. The most common memory types are CF or compact flash, SD card or secure digital card, memory stick, and XD cards.

    The Compact Flash card or CF card is the biggest camera memory cards. This type of card is meant for holding large amounts of data and is usually found in larger cameras. The card itself has over a dozen pin holes that’s connects to the card reader. You can usually find this memory in higher end Canon cameras.

    The most common camera memory card is the SD card or Secure Digital card. This memory is great because of its small size and storage. The card itself looks like a rectangle with one of the corners slanted. You can find SD cards in most cameras like Canon, Panasonic, Kodak, Nikon and many others.

    The memory stick is solely used by Sony. The Memory Stick also includes the Memory Stick Duo and Pro. They look a lot like SD cards except they are longer in size. You can also find this type of memory not only in Sony camera but in the Sony PSP.

    The XD card is another memory card that is only used by one company and that’s Fujifilm. The XD card is about half the size of the SD card. Fujifilm as of lately though has been replacing the XD card slots with SD card slots in their newer cameras. You can still find older camera models that use the XD card.

    We hope this helps with any decision you might be making for your next digital camera.

  • 42nd Street Photo Weather Photography Tips

    Posted on October 10th, 2011 Staff Writer

    We all know the old saying about weather, ‘if you don’t like the weather then just wait 5 minutes’ so shooting a great photo during any kind of weather should not be a problem. We are definitely sure you will not get bored. We do have a few tips though we would like to share with you that should help as well as keep you safe.

    First, be prepared for anything. Changing lenses or adjusting settings in extreme weather like cold, rain, or even snow can be difficult if you are not prepared.  During the Fall and Winter seasons it’s a good idea to have waterproof clothing and to layer your clothing. The worst thing is not being able to feel your fingers and attempting to work with your camera.

    Second, you will need to take precautions to protect your camera and other gear. Try keeping your camera and batteries dry and warm. I would suggest a plastic bag to keep your camera in when not using it. The change in weather temperatures can cause the lens on your camera to fog up quickly and can be quite frustrating. Your batteries can also lose the charge if they get to cold so try and keep them as warm as possible when not in use.

    What are you shooting? Don’t e afraid to focus on small thing as well the big picture. Shoot things like tracks in the snow or water covered roads. Shoot the trees bending if there are high winds or the snow blowing across a busy street. Take a look at the big picture as well like the lightening in the sky or the cloud formations and the great landscapes during these times.

    Just have fun and don’t be afraid to experiment and be prepared for anything to happen.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews the Samsung NX100

    Posted on October 4th, 2011 Staff Writer

    The new Samsung NX100 is one of the best in its class with its big sensor,  mirrorless interchangeable lens, and manual controls. Samsung boasts a 720p HD video, and an APS-C sensor with 14.6MP, all in a compact and lightweight camera. The Samsung NX100 has a brand new feature called iFunction, which enables you to make camera adjustments via a new button on compatible lenses. The iFunction feature lets you set up an extra layer of communication between camera and lens , so you get to use the Samsung NX100 lens’ focusing ring to adjust aperture, exposure compensation, and other key settings. This is a very tough and sturdy camera worth checking out.

    Specifications:

    Image Sensor: 14.6 million effective pixels.
    Metering:  Multi pattern, centre-weighted and spot.
    Sensor Size: APS-C-sized CMOS (23.4×15.6mm).
    Lens Factor: 1.5x.
    Lens: Samsung NX mount.
    Shutter Speed: 30 to 1/4000 second, Bulb.
    Continuous Shooting: three/ten JPEG shots/second (LCD on/off); three RAW shots/second.
    Memory: SD, SDHC cards.
    Image Sizes (pixels): 4592×3056 to 1280×1280.
    Movies: 1280×720, 640×480, 320×240 at 30 fps.
    LCD Screen: 7.6cm LCD (614,000 pixels).
    File Formats: JPEG, RAW, JPEG+RAW, MPEG4.
    ISO Sensitivity: Auto, 100 to 6400.
    Interface: USB 2.0, HDMI, AV, DC.
    Power: Rechargeable lithium ion battery, DC input.
    Dimensions: 120.5x71x34.5mm WHDmm.
    Weight: 340 g (inc battery and card).

     

    You can find this great buy at 42nd Street Photo.