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  • Underwater Photography Tips

    Posted on March 20th, 2012 Staff Writer

    There are many forms of photography out there today and one in particular is starting to rise with interest.  That would be the skill of underwater photography.  It is not unlike that of normal photography and can be performed even by the most novice photographer out there.  Just like regular photography there are few helpful tips in underwater photography.

    1. Become familiar with your underwater camera before entering the water.  With minimal time with your air supply and the fact that usually in the ocean there are no reshoots, it is best to become familiar with all settings and functions of your camera.  Also, most underwater cameras have specific depth requirements that you should become familiar with to prevent damage to your camera. No need to waste time with your camera instead of your pictures.
    2. Before venturing off to your underwater location, research the area for any specific interest.  Research for types of coral, fish, and other marine life in the area.  It is also a good idea also to check with the local currents and any sharp corals in the area.  The more you know of the area the more prepared you will be.
    3. Repeat your shots over and over again from different angles.  Underwater photography is an exciting adventure that some rarely have the opportunity to enjoy, so the  best thing to do is take multiple shots from different angles so you may have a wide variety of pictures.
    4. When taking photographs of the marine life you may encounter, the best way to capture their likeness is simple.  Focus in on their eyes, just like you would of a child.  It is best to also become familiar with the behavior of the potential marine life in the area.  Remember you are in their world and must respect them.

    Being prepared and using common sense can ensure of fun filled day of underwater photography.  Remember to have fun and be creative.

  • The Right Equipment for the Right Photographer

    Posted on March 16th, 2012 Staff Writer

    When purchasing your photography equipment there is a bit of excitement and awe of your new life line.  You spend hours even days becoming familiar with your equipment, settings, and lenses and take pride in the new piece.  Then you are aware of new equipment on the market and fear you do not have the quality as the new equipment for your photographs.  Rest assure, that before you jump up to by the new equipment there are a few things you can do to match these upgraded qualities.

    First, compare your old with the new equipment and find out specifically what has changed.  In every new piece of equipment the specifications seem better or more reliable, but with technology today the simplest solution could be to upgrade your old camera.  If you need more memory, you can simple purchase a larger memory from your local technology store.  Become clear of what is making this new camera so special.

    Second, most new equipment are being advertised with special features that can change the aspect of the picture to something elaborate.  If this type of photographs peaks your interest then explore your editing program to find if this program can accommodate your desire.  If you check with the manufacture or programmer of your software, sometimes they can give you upgrades to your program.  Sometimes the simplest and cost efficient way of solving a problem is right in your program.

    Third, taking several trips to your local camera store can give a lot of insight into the new equipment out there.  If they have the new equipment, experiment with it in the store and get a feel as to what it offers.  If you just absolutely have to have the new equipment, ask the store clerk if they do trade in.

    The first thing about being a photographer is to remember that the camera is not the sole reason behind a great photo, it is the photographer.  Once you find equipment you are comfortable with, then perhaps you should remain with the equipment and just upgrade when needed.

  • Tips On Creating a Portfolio

    Posted on March 8th, 2012 Staff Writer

    As you gain more and more experience it is a good idea to begin compiling a portfolio for prospective clients.  This is not a hard task to do and can be fun.  Every photographer should have some examples of their work to show potential clients.  With each new experience you may perform it is best to try new things, new locations, new view points, and if applicable new settings.  Taking one single shot and placing it in your portfolio can show the client the diversity in your work.  There are a few things to remember when putting together your portfolio.

    First, selecting shots that you feel comfortable doing is the key ingredient to a great portfolio.  If you have little to no experience with a particular shot, do not place this photo in your collection.  Instead take some time and practice the shot over and over again to gain the experience you feel comfortable promoting.

    Second, never be afraid to experiment with your photographs.  One thing that sets apart one photographer from another is the uniqueness of their photographs.  Try taking a shot in color then editing the same photo in black and white.  A lot of clients these days like to see diversity in work and placing such photos in your portfolio or perhaps gallery will add a unique characteristic to your reputation.

    Third, and most Important, when including individuals in your portfolio it is best that they know ahead of time that their picture may be included.  It is best to have the person sign an agreement that is legally binding to their knowledge of the photograph they are in and the future of said photo.  Remember it is always best to make sure your cross your t’s and dot your I’s.

    Fourth, if you are unsure of a particular photograph, it is not a bad idea to get another person’s opinion.  Although you friends and family will tell you what they think, it may be best to get another photographer’s opinion or perhaps someone in the arts industry.  Check with your local college or art school to inquire about any students or perhaps faculty that may be open to sharing their opinion.

    When putting together your portfolio it is best to take your time, use the right camera equipment, place photographs you are confident with, and select portraits that have meaning to you.  It is a simple procedure and can boost any business or reputation of a photographer.

  • 42nd Street Photo Wedding Photography Tips – Finding The Right Photographer

    Posted on March 5th, 2012 Staff Writer

    With springtime and summer approaching quickly the demand for photographers is in high pursuit for weddings.  A beautiful day for a loving couple one major aspect of wedding planning is finding the right photographer on a budget.  This can be very stressful for a couple and must be met with an open mind for the couple as well as the photographer.  These following tips can help with any relationship that photographer may have with a betrothed couple.

    First, understand that this day is important to everyone involved.  Communicating with the couple and those involved with planning is the key ingredient for business.  Be honest with your couple if you do not feel comfortable or do not have the experience in capturing special shots they wish to have.  Remember that it is their day and you work for them.  More and more wedding problems that arise typically involve the photographer and most of the time it is due to no communication.  Understand that word of mouth is usually one of the best ways that a photographer’s experience is advertised.

    Second, if you do not feel comfortable just yet for such a demanding professional job, then start small.  Booking such events as birthday parties or family reunions can give you the experience you need for large parties such as a wedding.  Something to remember about weddings is that there are no reshoots; there is no way to call back the client to adjust the photo.  Practicing events such as the ones mentioned above cannot be as stressful as a wedding and can also give you the experience you need.

    Third, once you have booked your wedding gig, take a moment and go to location before the event to become comfortable with the surroundings.  This is an easy way that you can become comfortable and be able to have an understanding of any settings you may need to adjust on the big day.  It is better to be prepared than unprepared.

    Most importantly, relax.  Take deep breathes and take your time.  If you find your wedding gig to be a large event, assign an assistant to help with the event and allow you to focus on the shots rather than on something else.

    Just remember that this day is about the couple but you are one of the most important elements in a wedding.  Communication and being prepared can help any photographer with this beautiful day.