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  • 42nd Street Photo Photography Etiquette Tips

    Posted on December 28th, 2012 Staff Writer

    Etiquette is a very important issue in photography because for most of us we interact so closely with our subjects or people related to the subjects we are shooting. The book definition of etiquette is ‘The customary code of polite behavior in society or among members of a particular profession or group.’ As far as how I myself see etiquette is being humble and polite, using words like ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ and respecting the people you work with. We are going to cover a few tips for etiquette photography that we hope you will find helpful.

    1. Be Respectful of all laws and cultures where photography may be frowned upon or you may need consent or authorization to photograph in a particular area.
    2. When shooting models do not touch them when directing poses, this will be considered rude so give them their space. Avoid using a commanding voice and be sure to praise and thank the models. Don not put blame or say demeaning things to your models as this can affect their attitude and the outcome of the shoot.
    3. Communicate often with the models about their interest as this will create a better atmosphere.
    4. Always ask permission before taking someone’s photograph. Be sure before publishing anyone’s photograph that you have a signed release form. They do have the right to sue if their permission was not granted.

    These are just a few tips that cover photography etiquette; we hope you find these helpful. Be sure to stop by http://www.42photo.com

  • 42nd Street Photo’s Canon EOS M Review

    Posted on December 20th, 2012 Staff Writer

    The Canon EOS M is a compact camera with a magnesium alloy body that comes in four colors, white, red, black, and silver. The price for the Canon EOS M is in the $700-$800 range. The Canon EOS M is really a simple camera with buttons and dials on the camera kept to a minimum. The Canon EOS M also comes with large touchscreen on the back which is the preferred method for interacting with the camera. This is also Canon’s first mirrorless digital camera and it definitely meets the Canon standard. The sensor is as large as you would find on the majority of Canon’s DLSR cameras which has fantastic image quality. The Canon EOS-M also comes with a new EF-M mount 22mm f/2 STM lens. The Canon EOS M also offers full HD 1080p movie mode. The only thing we found lacking with this camera is a lack of a grip and the battery life only allows for about 230 shots. Overall this is really a great camera for every level of photographer, easy to use, picture quality is outstanding. Below are some other features of this camera.

    Canon EOS M key features

    • New EF-M lens mount (optimized for APS-C sensor size)
    • 18MP APS-C ‘Hybrid CMOS’ sensor
    • Continuous autofocus in movie mode with subject tracking
    • 14-bit DIGIC5 processor
    • ISO 100-12800 standard, 25600 expanded
    • 4.3 fps continuous shooting, 3 fps with autofocus tracking
    • 1080p30 video recording, stereo sound (with 25p or 24p options)
    • External microphone socket and adjustable sound recording level
    • 1040k dot 3:2 touch-sensitive ClearView II LCD (capacitative type, multi-touch support)
    • Standard EOS hot-shoe for external flash (no built-in flash)
    • ‘Creative Filters’ image-processing controls, previewed live on-screen

    If you are interested in this camera be sure and stop by http://www.42photo.com

  • Christmas Card Photography Tips

    Posted on December 12th, 2012 Staff Writer

    Christmas is right around the corner and you might want to send out personal Christmas cards to friends and family. If you are thinking of including a family photo with your card we are going to cover some tips in this article to ensure you have the best Christmas card possible.

    Equipment – You want to make sure you have the photography equipment. You don’t have to hire a professional or even be a professional photographer, but that doesn’t mean you want to have a poor photo either. Consider using a tripod so your camera is steady. Also consider natural light unless of course you have Christmas tree in your photo.

    Start Early – The best thing you can do is starting shooting your photos early and don’t wait until the last minute. This way if you don’t like the way they turned out you can reshoot them.

    Photo Idea Be creative with whatever the subject matter may be in your photo. You might prefer a Christmas tree in the photo or something religious or formal. It’s all up to you but be creative and make the photo really stand out!

    Picking a Card – Once you have taken your photo you need a card to stick it on or inside of. There are many options available for cards that you can either create or even buy from a store like Wal-Mart. You can pick up one sided cards that are usually 4”x8” that will accommodate a photograph, or you can go with a folding card which are very popular due to their professional look.

    We hope these few tips help with the creation of your Christmas card this year and be sure and stop by http://www.42photo.com if you are looking a great camera to capture those holiday shots.

  • Snow Photography Tips

    Posted on December 6th, 2012 Staff Writer

    The opportunity for winter photography is right around the corner if not already in your area. If you live in the part of the country where it snows on a regular basis through the winter then you can shoot some great photographs. We are going to cover a few tips that should help you take some great photos.

    When is the best time to shoot? Usually the best time is early morning or late evening when the sun is not directly overhead. The reflection of the sun off the snow can make things look hazy but you can also counter this with a lens hood. Mornings are also good right after it snowed because you don’t have to worry about footprints and the ground is untouched.

    Dress Appropriately. I know this seems obvious but be sure you have all the right items, from warm to waterproof. You lose heat quickly in snowy conditions so don’t forget a hat as your head gives off a lot of heat.

    Have Your Equipment Ready. Have all your equipment ready including batteries fully charged. Try to keep your camera in a camera bag while moving around and don’t let it get too cold.

    Adjust Your Exposure. You will have to adjust your exposure as snow will confuse your camera and make the snow look gray. If you have a winter or snow mode on your camera then turn it on, if not you will have to make manual adjustments. Frame and focus your shot, zoom in to a bright area of snow. Then using your exposure compensation button, dial in a value between +2/3 to +1 2/3 EV, this will depend on the brightness. Take a meter reading and use those settings after switching to manual. This should make the snow look white.

    Be creative with your snow photography, try different shutter speeds and be sure and shoot in RAW format for easier editing in post production. We hope these few tips help and be sure and stop by http://www.42photo.com for all your photography needs.

  • Holiday Lights Photography Tips

    Posted on December 4th, 2012 Staff Writer

    This is the time of the year when many of the world’s cultures celebrate holidays that involve lights of some kind. Years ago to get good shots of holiday lights could be quite a task due to the sensitivity of film, this is no longer the case as new technology has solved this issue with the introduction of DSLR cameras, ISO settings, and auto–exposure. Using a fast ISO around 800 is a great setting for shooting holiday lights.

    I will also touch on will be the need of a flash, there will be very few occasions for your flash. When you are taking a photo without flash there are a few things you want to remember, use a slow shutter speed and try using tripod if possible to avoid camera shake. If you in the middle of s shot and you are not sure if there is enough lighting just go ahead and take one with the flash and one without the flash. If you are shooting holiday lights there is probably no need for a flash at all. Another great tip is to start photographing around twilight, this way you capture some of the sky in the background instead of complete blackness. Let’s say you are photographing a friend in front of lights, if you use the flash you like up your friend but the light are really dim. If you don’t use your flash you get the lights but a very shady picture of your friend. Well luckily there is a setting on most cameras for an issue just like this. The symbol for this setting on many cameras is sort of a hieroglyph that tries to indicate person at night in front of lights, using this setting should solve that problem.

    Lets see what we have gone over that should help you.

    • Turn off your flash unless you have a very good reason to use it.
    • Use a fast ISO – we suggest ISO 800.
    • Avoid camera shake.
    • Use a tripod

    We hope that you find this few tips helpful and useful. Be sure and stop by http://www.42photo.com for all your photography needs.