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  • 42nd Street Photo recommends the Panasonic HDC-TM20K 16GB High Definition Camcorder

    Posted on November 17th, 2010 Staff Writer

    Panasonic HDC-TM20K 16GB High Definition CamcorderThe Panasonic HDC-TM20K is a sub $600 camera that really seems to be an excellent deal. This one is at the cheaper end but that doesn’t always mean that you lose out in terms of performance. This is a entry level camcorder but as far as we can see it certainly doesn’t miss anything on technology. The Panasonic HDC-TM20K is a sleek black unit that thankfully has refrained from the red stripe around the lens, and is not too heavy on the branding and writing which is a definite improvement. The unit is small and neat and follows the standard format of most camcorders.

    The Panasonic HDC-TM20K has 16x optical zoom function, and the quality of images captured on zoom is excellent and clarity is not lost. One of the best features of the Panasonic HDC-TM20K HD camcorder is the iA (intelligent auto) mode. When this mode is selected, the camcorder automatically selects the optimal settings to produce the best video quality. This camcorder has the standard OIS technology, which means that any shake of the hand is compensated for and the picture adjusted to make sure this is not noticed on playback.

    This is a camcorder that will appeal most to the home use. The quality of the HD videos is very good, accompanied by crisp and clear audio. The lens cap is built in and opens when the unit is switched on, which again is a nice touch and means there is nothing separate to lose. For the money and quality we recommend the Panasonic HDC-TM20K 16GB High Definition Camcorder.

  • What Every Digital Photographer Should Know About HDTV

    Posted on October 3rd, 2008 Staff Writer

    It may come as a surprise to some of you that knowing how to use a digital camera is just the beginning. Still, to some, it may be common sense – don’t feel bad if you are of the former, as there is enough technology to force even the most savvy consumer to turn their head 360 degrees. Sure, the digital age is moving faster than ever, but that doesn’t mean that the staff at 42nd Street Photo need a crash course – they know digital like you know your own children.

    So, what about this whole HDTV thing? Obviously, many of us are taking the neccessary steps to ensure we don’t get stuck without our digital converter box for broadcast television, come February 17, 2009. But how many of us know about other areas of compatibility? This one area of which we speak, is of course, the compatibility between your digital photos and your HDTV.

    Wait, you don’t have an HDTV, you say? Well, then you may want to consider it.

    While the purchase of a high definition, flat screen television is not neccessarily a must, there are many advantages to owning one, including a great way to view your digital photos. Many models are now built with SD card slots, and if you’re one of those “always prepared” digital photographers, you more than likely use SD cards as your preferred storage device for images captured with your digital camera of choice. This is good.

    As of now, the highest resolution available for an HDTV is 1920×1080 pixels, and most DSLR cameras can capture better resolution images than that. Furthermore, if you decide to purchase one of the more modestly sized HDTV’s, you will get around a 1280×720 pixel resolution. Either way, there is little to no concern for the images not displaying well on an HDTV.

    Before you begin wondering why the best resoultion HDTV’s have a lower pixel count than many digital cameras, consider the fact that larger images require more memory, so all your images can be taken at (or resized down to) your televisions resolution for the best compatibility. Unless you’re shooting photos for a magazine, newspaper, or other print media, there is no need to capture your images at the highest resolution your camera offers, nor is there a need at present for an HDTV to display as many pixels, since pixels displayed on a screen are displayed differently from pixels printed on paper. SO, what does this mean? It means your images will look better at the same resolution as your HDTV than they will at a larger resolution, and it also means you have a lot more room to store images.

    But, in case you are still hung up the HDTV peak at 1920×1080 resolution, let us educated you as to why. While some would debate this fact (probably those with eagle eyes), that particular resolution is best viewed at a distance from the television equal to, or greater than, twice the height of the screen. If they were to squeeze any more pixels into the screen, there would be no significant difference in the quality you view at that distance. So why pay more for resolution you’re not going to be able to appreciate?

    A lot of times, we need to sit back and enjoy the digital age, instead of pushing for more memory, better resolution, faster processors. Digital is moving fast enough as it is – we don’t need to speed it up, we need to enjoy it, and with an HDTV, you’ll have a whole new way to enjoy your digital photos.

  • Nikon Reveals DSLR Camera with HD Video

    Posted on September 24th, 2008 Staff Writer

    Most digital cameras on the market now, including a lot of point and shoot cameras, are capable of capturing video. Most SLR cameras, however, do not have the same advantage over the point and shoot cameras in the way of video capture, as they do when it comes to capturing higher quality images. Nikon, however, has revealed a DSLR camera which can capture HD video.

    You may be asking yourself what the big deal is. Every day, digital gets better, and its uses extend further. A few years ago, it was not as common for the general population of digital camera owners to put together DVD’s, slideshows, or presentations featuring their family vacation, but with the advances in resolution, software, and overall ease of use, many more are getting into it.

    Sharing is the key word. How do you want to share your digital visual media? Bigger, better…higher resolution? Indeed. That is why the Nikon D90 is a big deal. It captures 1280x720p high-definition video with sound. Additionally, rather than focusing on higher mega pixel count (although at 12.3MP, most uses should not require any more), the D90 has borrowed the APS-Csized CMOS sensor from the higher-end D300, making it a significant improvement over and able replacement for the D80 in many ways.

    However, there are a few disadvantages to the D90 when it comes to video. The most noticable difference between the D90 and a similar quality (and definition) digital camcorder, is its frames-per-second rate. While DVC’s will generally give you 30fps, the D90 tops out at 24fps. Additionally, the sensor chip can overheat with extended use, and by extended use, we mean 5-25 minutes of constant video capturing. Basically, at the camera’s highest definition and quality settings, the user is limited to 5 minutes of recording time. At a more standard definition, between 640×480 and 800×600, the capture can last up to 25 minutes.

    The estimated price for this piece of equipment is set at around $1,000 for the body, or $1,300 to include a AF-S DX Nikkor 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR lens, but we just wont know until it hits the market.

    For more information on Digital Cameras, please visit 42nd Street Photo at 42photo.com.

  • Welcome to the 42 Photo Blog!

    Posted on July 7th, 2008 Sales

    Thanks for stopping by the new 42nd Street Photo blog. We hope to keep you informed of the latest products and special offers from 42nd Street Photo here, as well as post relevant information on digital cameras and accessories.

    If you haven’t been to our online store yet, visit www.42photo.com today to enjoy our large selection of digital audio and video products. We have been in business for over 40 years, and we’re one of New York’s finest camera stores.