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  • Tips for Protecting Your Camera During Cold Weather

    Posted on December 12th, 2011 Staff Writer

    When using an outside setting for your photographs can be fun and exciting, it is very important to take care of your camera in cold weather.  Most digital cameras’ default settings can be adjusted to compensate for the weather but some cannot.  Here are a few helpful tips to avoid damaging your camera and capturing unwanted photographs.

    Keep your batteries and camera warm.  Some photographers don’t even put batteries in until it is time to photograph.  To conserve batteries, turn of any extra feature such as the LCD to save energy.  Also keep a spare of batteries in your pocket close to your body.

    Place your camera in a plastic bag to avoid any potential condensation from developing on the camera lens.  If the camera is in the plastic bag, take it out for photos then immediately place back in the bag for safety.  This will prevent the camera from appearing “Foggy”.  If condensation does form, immediately stop using the camera, remove the batteries, lens cap, and memory card

    Once the photographer has returned home, immediately give the camera time to adjust to the temperature change.  Place the camera in an unheated room for about 30 minutes.  Also keep the camera in the camera bag to minimize any condensation.

    These are just a few tips for protecting your camera during the cold weather months.

  • 42nd Street Photo’s Tips for Deleting Photos

    Posted on December 4th, 2011 Staff Writer

    After we take a picture so many people are too quick delete a portrait.  I look awful, the picture looks blurry, it’s too dark; these are all things we have said at one point after a photograph is taken .Don’t be so quick to delete the photos on your digital camera just yet.  There are some reasons the picture looks bad.

    • The LCD screen at the back of your camera has a different calibration than that of the actual picture.  So if the picture looks bad on the LCD screen then wait till you can get to a bigger screen to determine the actually quality.  At this time there is no way to calibrate the LCD to your liking so just be patient and wait till you get to your big screen.
    • Sometimes when so quick to delete a photo we accidentally delete the wrong one.  So the best way to avoid this situation is to simply wait till the images can be uploaded to a computer for further review.
    • Back to the LCD.  LCD takes up a lot of battery to view those images just captured.  If you spend a lot of time deleting or configuring an image then you waist battery supply and end up with a dead camera.
    • A good photographer can capture many images at a time.  If you waist time deleting images right then and there you are also wasting time on potential photos that can be captured at that time.So the simplest fix to photos that appear unflattering at the moment is to just don’t delete until you can view them the way they are suppose to be viewed.
  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews The Pentax Optio WG-1

    Posted on November 17th, 2011 Staff Writer

    If you are looking for a tough and rugged camera that can withstand the elements then the Pentax Optio WG-1 is what you need.  This camera is built for the most rugged and sports type activities. This camera looks and feels like a real sports camera. The outer casing is made of hardened plastic and looks like a camera you would carry on an adventurous outing. The Pentax Optio WG-1 is waterproof up to 10 meters and shock proof to 1.5 meters able to withstand weight of up to 100 kilogram-force, coldproof to negative 14°F, and dustproof.

    The Pentax Optio WG-1 also boasts 14 megapixels and shoots some impressively sharp pictures. The camera also comes with a 5x zoom and 4:3, 16:9, and 1:1 aspect ratio and shoots in a lower resolution. The WG-1 also has an HDMI connection for direct viewing of your HD video on your HDTV. Also included is Digital Microscope mode for macro shooting.

    Features

    • Geo-tagging function
    • Waterproof to 10m
    • Shockproof to 1.5m
    • Coldproof to -10°C
    • Crushproof to 100kg
    • 14 megapixel sensor
    • 5x wide-angle optical zoom
    • HD movie recording
    • ISO80 – 6400
    • Digital microscope
    • Carabiner strap
    • 1cm minimum focus distance

    This camera is built to take on the rough and tough world and will impress the most adventurous type.

  • Cycling Photography Tips

    Posted on October 31st, 2011 Staff Writer

    Cycling photography can be challenging but with the right tips and know how it also can be fun. We will give few tips in this article to get you started.

    Using Your Flash – Use your flash when shooting cyclists. The reason for this is the sun will cast shadows on the face and bodies of the riders. This will fill those shadows with light which in turn will create more dynamic images.

    Shutter Speed –Choosing the right shutter speed can have a great affect on your shots. For stop action use a shutter speed that is 1/250 of a second or faster. You might have an automatic setting; usually a sport setting that will take care of this for you.  As cyclists pass follow the riders with your camera. The combination of panning and slow shutter speed keeps the cyclist in focus while blurring the background.

    Angles – Shoot high and low, in other words shoot from low points and high points. Get those different images that people aren’t use to seeing.

    Practice – These days it’s not near as hard to become good at cycling and sports photography due to the digital camera era. The more time you put in to your photos the better your results will be. You will learn what settings work and what settings don’t.

    Thanks for stopping by the 42nd Street Photo blog and we hope to see you again soon.

  • Digital Camera Memory Types

    Posted on October 17th, 2011 Staff Writer

    If you own a digital camera or cameras then you probably know about the different types of memory involved. There are multiple types of memory cards and depending on the type of camera you own you need to know which type is right for your model of camera. The most common memory types are CF or compact flash, SD card or secure digital card, memory stick, and XD cards.

    The Compact Flash card or CF card is the biggest camera memory cards. This type of card is meant for holding large amounts of data and is usually found in larger cameras. The card itself has over a dozen pin holes that’s connects to the card reader. You can usually find this memory in higher end Canon cameras.

    The most common camera memory card is the SD card or Secure Digital card. This memory is great because of its small size and storage. The card itself looks like a rectangle with one of the corners slanted. You can find SD cards in most cameras like Canon, Panasonic, Kodak, Nikon and many others.

    The memory stick is solely used by Sony. The Memory Stick also includes the Memory Stick Duo and Pro. They look a lot like SD cards except they are longer in size. You can also find this type of memory not only in Sony camera but in the Sony PSP.

    The XD card is another memory card that is only used by one company and that’s Fujifilm. The XD card is about half the size of the SD card. Fujifilm as of lately though has been replacing the XD card slots with SD card slots in their newer cameras. You can still find older camera models that use the XD card.

    We hope this helps with any decision you might be making for your next digital camera.

  • 42nd Street Photo Weather Photography Tips

    Posted on October 10th, 2011 Staff Writer

    We all know the old saying about weather, ‘if you don’t like the weather then just wait 5 minutes’ so shooting a great photo during any kind of weather should not be a problem. We are definitely sure you will not get bored. We do have a few tips though we would like to share with you that should help as well as keep you safe.

    First, be prepared for anything. Changing lenses or adjusting settings in extreme weather like cold, rain, or even snow can be difficult if you are not prepared.  During the Fall and Winter seasons it’s a good idea to have waterproof clothing and to layer your clothing. The worst thing is not being able to feel your fingers and attempting to work with your camera.

    Second, you will need to take precautions to protect your camera and other gear. Try keeping your camera and batteries dry and warm. I would suggest a plastic bag to keep your camera in when not using it. The change in weather temperatures can cause the lens on your camera to fog up quickly and can be quite frustrating. Your batteries can also lose the charge if they get to cold so try and keep them as warm as possible when not in use.

    What are you shooting? Don’t e afraid to focus on small thing as well the big picture. Shoot things like tracks in the snow or water covered roads. Shoot the trees bending if there are high winds or the snow blowing across a busy street. Take a look at the big picture as well like the lightening in the sky or the cloud formations and the great landscapes during these times.

    Just have fun and don’t be afraid to experiment and be prepared for anything to happen.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews the Samsung NX100

    Posted on October 4th, 2011 Staff Writer

    The new Samsung NX100 is one of the best in its class with its big sensor,  mirrorless interchangeable lens, and manual controls. Samsung boasts a 720p HD video, and an APS-C sensor with 14.6MP, all in a compact and lightweight camera. The Samsung NX100 has a brand new feature called iFunction, which enables you to make camera adjustments via a new button on compatible lenses. The iFunction feature lets you set up an extra layer of communication between camera and lens , so you get to use the Samsung NX100 lens’ focusing ring to adjust aperture, exposure compensation, and other key settings. This is a very tough and sturdy camera worth checking out.

    Specifications:

    Image Sensor: 14.6 million effective pixels.
    Metering:  Multi pattern, centre-weighted and spot.
    Sensor Size: APS-C-sized CMOS (23.4×15.6mm).
    Lens Factor: 1.5x.
    Lens: Samsung NX mount.
    Shutter Speed: 30 to 1/4000 second, Bulb.
    Continuous Shooting: three/ten JPEG shots/second (LCD on/off); three RAW shots/second.
    Memory: SD, SDHC cards.
    Image Sizes (pixels): 4592×3056 to 1280×1280.
    Movies: 1280×720, 640×480, 320×240 at 30 fps.
    LCD Screen: 7.6cm LCD (614,000 pixels).
    File Formats: JPEG, RAW, JPEG+RAW, MPEG4.
    ISO Sensitivity: Auto, 100 to 6400.
    Interface: USB 2.0, HDMI, AV, DC.
    Power: Rechargeable lithium ion battery, DC input.
    Dimensions: 120.5x71x34.5mm WHDmm.
    Weight: 340 g (inc battery and card).

     

    You can find this great buy at 42nd Street Photo.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews the Panasonic DMC-ZS8

    Posted on September 21st, 2011 Staff Writer

    The Panasonic DMC-ZS8 is everything you want in a basic digital camera with megazoom and great photo quality and shooting performance. The ZS8 includes a high resolution 14.1MP CCD sensor, a super zoom 16x ultra wide-angle 24-384mm Leica lens and 1280 x 720 high definition video. This camera is vey compact as well as user friendly. This camera also packs one USB port, a component video output, an SD memory card slot and more. The ZS8 is also capable of burst shooting at a rate of up to 1.9 frames per second at full, 14.1 megapixel resolution. Also included is Intelligent Auto Mode, auto focus, face detection and subject tracking.

    Panasonic DMC-ZS8 Hightlights

    • 14.1MP CCD Sensor
    • Leica 16x 24-384mm (Equiv) Zoom Lens
    • 3″ TFT LCD Display 230K-Dot Resolution
    • 1280×720 HD Video
    • Manual Exposure Mode
    • Intelligent Scene Selector Mode
    • Easy Upload to Facebook/YouTube
    • Advanced Face Recognition Mode
    • Image Stabilization
    • Intelligent Resolution Function

    The Panasonic DMC-ZS8 is great camera for the price. Stop by 42nd Street Photo and pick it up today.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF3

    Posted on September 7th, 2011 Staff Writer

    The Panasonic GF3 is a highly capable compact interchangeable lens camera with excellent image and video capture capability. The Panasonic GF3 is great camera for beginners that have been using point and shoot cameras and wish to upgrade to a DSLR. The GF3 has a lot to like about it. The GF3 is small really easy to use, capable of producing excellent images and has user friendliness in mind.

    The Panasonic GF3 includes a 14-42mm zoom lens.  It also has a fast maximum aperture of f/2.5, making the GF3 perfect for use in low-light conditions and easier to blur the background to help emphasize the main subject. In good light, shutter lag is 0.3 second, 0.6 second in low light. Flash recycling time is 1.6 seconds which is still pretty good and continuous shooting rate is a 3.9fps. The camera also includes a popup flash which is embedded above the lens. The GF3 also captures HD video. You can record up to 1080/60i videos in the AVCHD format.

    Items Included:

    •  Lumix G Vario 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 ASPH/MEGA O.I.S. Lens
    •  Front and Rear Lens Caps
    •  Battery Charger
    •  Battery Pack
    •  Battery Case
    •  Body Cap
    •  Hot Shoe Cover
    •  Shoulder Strap
    •  AV Cable
    •  USB Connection Cable
    •  Stylus Pen
    •  Software CD-ROM

    The GF3 is a good choice for a light and compact camera that is versatile and considered a hybrid between DSLR and point and shoot.

  • Canon EOS Rebel T3i is Top Class

    Posted on August 22nd, 2011 Staff Writer

    The new Canon EOS Rebel T3i is the newest high end camera that is just above the Rebel T3 and last year’s Rebel T2i. The biggest difference between the Rebel T2i and the Rebel T3i is the new flip-out and rotating LCD display on the T3i. The Canon EOS Rebel T3i still includes the 18.0 MP sensor which was included in the T2i. Trust me when I say the T3i will not disappoint you with the picture quality no matter if shot in low light or with high ISO. The Canon EOS Rebel T3i also carries the DIGIC 4 processor to keep your performance level at top speed when snapping pictures. No matter what the picture quality is high even when shooting at 6400 ISO. This camera also includes full HD video recording and live view shooting.

     

    Other Specifications:

    • SD/SDHC/SDXC Memory Card Slot
    • 18MP APS-C CMOS Sensor
    • DIGIC 4 Imaging Processor
    • 3.0″ Clear View Vari-Angle LCD
    • 100-6400 ISO
    • Full HD Movie Mode w/ Manual Exposure
    • Compatible with Canon EF and EF-S Lenses
    • 3.7 Frames/Second Continuous Shooting
    • 63 Zone Dual-Layer Metering / 9-Point AF
    • Intelligent Auto Mode

    If you are new to photography this camera is not for you. This is for the experienced photographer who is already well versed with Canon products and DSLRs. This camera offers the best options for a camera of its price with outstanding results.

  • Leatherman Wave is a Great Buy

    Posted on August 6th, 2011 Staff Writer

    The Leatherman Wave is one of the most popular tools on the market. The Leatherman Wave comes with over a dozen tools. The Wave also comes in stainless steel or black oxide. The Wave was redesigned in 2004 and was given larger knives, stronger pliers, longer wire cutters and all-locking blades. This tool is perfect for any job large or small as well as regular day tasks. The reviews on the Wave have been better than outstanding. Leatherman builds great products right here in the United States since 1983.

    Tools Included:

    •  420HC Clip Point Knife
    • 420HC Sheepsfoot Serrated Knife
    • Needlenose Pliers
    • Regular Pliers
    • Wire Cutters
    • Hard-wire Cutters
    • Wire Stripper
    • Large Screwdriver
    • Large Bit Driver
    • Small Bit Driver
    • Scissors
    • Wood/Metal File
    • Diamond-coated File
    • Saw
    • Bottle Opener
    • Can Opener
    • 8 in | 19 cm Ruler
    • INCLUDED BITS: Phillips and Flat Tip Eyeglasses Screwdriver Bit, Phillips #1-2 and 3/16″ Bit

    Be sure and try out the Leatherman Wave today if you are looking for a long lasting and reliable tool.

  • 42nd Street Photo’s Tips for Taking Great Pictures

    Posted on July 23rd, 2011 Staff Writer

    Ever asked how some people take the most perfect photographs? Would you to like to become a better photographer? We are going to cover a few tips that will help you do just that.

    Light – Light is important in every picture. It will affect your photo in every way. For natural light we suggest early morning or late evening. If you have to be out during the day its best to have the sun at your back.

    Direct Eye Contact – This can be as important as light when photographing your subject. Try to be ay there level and capture those great smiles. This adds more of a personal feeling in the picture.

    Background – Put a background behind the subject that isn’t cluttered. Use something simple that will allow the subject to stand out.

    Settings – Understand the settings on your camera. Read through your manual, this will help ion the long run to get those photographs you always wanted.

    Flash When Outdoors – This might sound crazy for those of you that have never tried this. Using the flash outdoors will eliminate shadows. This will help the person stand out in your picture.
    We hope these few tips get you going in the right direction. Remember don’t be shy about taking picture. Let your digital camera loose and take as many pictures as you can. You start getting it right as you go.

  • 42nd Street Photo’s Poolside Photography Tips

    Posted on July 7th, 2011 Staff Writer

    The summer is here and the temperatures are hot. More than likely at some point this summer you will probably find yourself at a poll of your own or with friends. This also provides a great chance to take some great photo with your digital camera. Here are a few tips to try out when poolside and you are snapping shots.

    • Understand your digital camera, read your manual, play with the settings
    • Batteries and memory cards. Make sure your batteries are new or charged and you have plenty of room on your memory cards
    • Keep your camera stores when not using it. Be sure you have a case or a bag to place your camera in when not using it. Keep out of the sun and away from the water
    • Beware of the sun, natural light is great but when at the pool try and get the sun behind you. Understand your ISO settings will also help when there is a lot of sun.
    • Take a lot of photos, you can’t go wrong here. Not all your photos are going to be perfect so take as many photos as you can.
    • Make sure you have stable footing and a good foundation; you don’t want to find yourself and your camera in the pool.

    We do hope you have a great summer and take some great photos. Thanks for stopping by.

  • Digital Cameras and Megapixels – Is More Always Better?

    Posted on June 24th, 2011 Staff Writer

    Earlier in the 21st century as digital cameras were really starting to get popular resolution like megapixels was more important than it is now. Low resolution usually meant smaller prints and not so sharp an image. Things have changed though and a higher megapixel number is not always better.

    First let’s discuss what a megapixel actually is. A megapixel is one million pixels and a pixel is a single point or dot on a graphic image. If your camera is 8 megapixels, it means that any pictures it takes on the highest quality setting will consist of 8 million of these pixels. Somewhere around 5 megapixels will give you good quality 8×10 shots. Most people think that a higher pixel rating will give you better pictures and that is not true. The higher megapixel camera merely contains more pixels and a higher resolution in the photos it takes, but it’s not necessarily any sharper than a lower megapixel camera. This is a great theory but actually this creates a terrible photo with more dots. There are many factors that affect the quality of the shot besides the megapixels.

    Other factors to consider besides megapixels are sensor size, type of camera, and quality of the camera. Image noise and ISO also will factor into your shots. There is no real advantage to having a 12 megapixel digital camera and the pixels will actually make your photo less attractive when image noise comes into play. The more megapixels you add to a sensor the more densely they are packed together which will result in image noise and unclear shots. Once you get past 7 or 8 pixels in a point and shoot camera most sensors are struggling to keep up.

    The best cameras all use larger sensors but in turn they are much more expensive and fall in the category of DSLR. These larger sensors produce less image noise which results in a much clearer shot. These cameras also usually have a higher ISO setting which also contributes to a better photo. When are out looking at point and shoot cameras keep these facts in mind, compare sensor sizes to the megapixel rating. In the end you could be saving yourself quite a bit of money.

  • Great Deals on Leatherman Tools at 42nd Street Photo

    Posted on June 13th, 2011 Staff Writer

    If you are looking for Leatherman Tools in New York City then you need to stop in at our store location of 42nd Street Photo or check out the stock of our Leatherman Tools online. If you have never heard of Leatherman Tools then let tell you about them as I think you will be very impressed. This tool is like having a small toolbox that fits in the palm of your hand and they are made to endure anything.  Leatherman also makes very durable hunting knives and pocket knives. Check out some of the items below.

    Leatherman Core Stainless Finish With Leather SheathThe Core is great tool for the toughest jobs. This single tool has over a dozen tools like needle nose pliers, wire cutters, screwdrivers, wire stripper and much more. The handles are rounded perfectly to give you a firm grip when working.

    Leatherman Kick with Leather SheathThis a great and efficient tool with a lot of engineering put in to it.  The Kick has the same strong pliers as the other Leatherman just a bit narrower and light weight.  The Kick comes with over a dozen tools as well.

    Leatherman Klamath Folding Blade Hunting KnifeThe knife is well made and holds the edge very well. When opened it locks securely with a strong lock back mechanism. A sheath is also included and includes a diamond sharpener in the handle.

    Leatherman Expanse ( E33B) Knife with Drop-PointThis is a smaller knife than the hunting knife and is made from 154CM stainless steel. This in turn allows the blade to last longer. It also includes a bit driver with bit storage in the handle for added screwdriver functions. It also features a  bottle opener and carabiner clip to hook to a belt loop or on a backpack.

    These are just some of the Leatherman tools you can find at 42nd Street Photo so stop by and check out our great selection.

  • Photography Terms You Should Be Familiar With

    Posted on May 25th, 2011 Staff Writer

    Today we are going to cover a few photography term you should be familiar with it comes to your camera or talking to other photographers.  Photography has its own language basically and you can get lost quick. Here are some terms we think will help.

    Aperture – A small, circular opening inside the lens that can change in diameter to control the amount of light reaching the camera’s sensor as a picture is taken. The aperture diameter is expressed in f-stops; the lower the number, the larger the aperture. Aperture affects depth of field, the smaller the aperture, the greater is the zone of sharpness, the bigger the aperture, the zone of sharpness is reduced.

    Aperture Ring – A ring, located on the outside of the lens usually behind the focusing ring, which is linked mechanically to the diaphragm to control the size of the aperture; it is engraved with a set of numbers called f-numbers or f- stops.

    Camera Shake – Movement of camera caused by unsteady hold or support, vibration, etc., leading, particularly at slower shutter speeds, to a blurred image on the film. It is a major cause of un-sharp pictures, especially with long focus lenses.

    Contrast – The difference between the darkest and lightest areas in a photo. The greater the difference, the higher the contrast.

    Depth of Field – Depth of Field (or DOF) is decided by the given lens opening (aperture) or f/stop. A small aperture (large f/number: f/16, f/22, etc.) will give a large depth of field; the image will be sharp/in focus from the foreground to infinity. A large aperture (small f/number: f/1.8, f/2.8, etc.) will give a shallow depth of field.

    ISO – International Standards Organization; the number represents the film’s sensitivity to light. A higher ISO number indicates the film is more sensitive and requires less light for a proper exposure.

    RAW – The RAW image format is the data as it comes directly off the CCD, with no in-camera processing is performed.

    Shutter speed – The camera’s shutter speed is a measurement of how long its shutter remains open as the picture is taken. The slower the shutter speed, the longer the exposure time. When the shutter speed is set to 1/125 or simply 125, this means that the shutter will be open for exactly 1/125th of one second.

    White balance – A function on the camera to compensate for different colors of light being emitted by different light sources.

    These are just a few of the most often used terms we hear when speaking to other photographers. There are many more term that can be used but this should get you going in the right direction.

  • Waterfall Photography Tips

    Posted on May 9th, 2011 Staff Writer

    So you are going on vacation this summer and waterfalls are in the mix. You probably want to shoot some great pictures of these waterfalls to show off to your friends right? We are going to provide you with a few simple but useful tips to get those photos that you want.

    Use A Slow Shutter Speed

    Use a slow shutter speed for shooting waterfall photos. The slower shutter speed settings will make the waterfalls look professionally shot. You also have to compensate slow shutter speed by selecting small aperture and in turn you will also get a greater depth of field.

    Use A Tripod

    Not an article goes by that I don’t mention a tripod. When shooting at slow shutter speeds the camera has to be very steady. The goal is to blur the movement of the water while everything else remains in sharp focus. You will get a picture where everything is blurred because of the camera shake if you are not carrying a tripod.

    Use Filters

    A Neutral Density (ND) filter is great to have for waterfall photography. This comes in especially handy when the scene is very bright. It darkens the image and reduces the amount of light from entering the camera without altering the color or tone of the light, thus decreasing the shutter speeds to accommodate the reduction of light.

    Weather

    As with most photography early, evening, and overcast days are best for shooting. These days are ideal for waterfall photography. Do not shoot waterfalls during mid-day or when the sun is at full capacity. Bright light will create high contrast and this will overexposure white water and underexposure dark shadows.

    Practice

    This comes with the territory. Every scene is different resulting in changing of our camera settings so practice. Take more than a few pictures, take a lot of pictures. With enough time your friends will think you pulled that photo from National Geographic.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews Olympus SP-800UZ Digital Camera
    42nd Street Photo Reviews Olympus SP-800UZ Digital Camera 0.0 out of 5 based on 2 ratings.

    Posted on April 27th, 2011 Staff Writer

    When the Olympus SP-800UZ was released it was one of only two digital cameras to have a 30x zoom leans. The lens covers a 35mm equivalent focal range of 28-840mm. Maximum aperture varies from f/2.8 to f/5.6 across the zoom range. Shutter speeds range from 1/2,000 to four seconds. Seven white balance settings are provided, including automatic and six presets. The Olympus SP800UZ stores images in JPEG format, and is also able to record movies at high-definition 720p resolution or below, using MPEG-4 compression. The camera also includes a 14-megapixel sensor, a 3-inch wide-screen LCD monitor, 720p HD movie recording capability, mechanical image stabilization, high-speed continuous shooting at various speeds and resolution settings, and 2GB of internal storage plus SD card compatibility. The camera allows you to create stylized looks for your photos with Creative Art Filters, and use the Panorama mode to create one large image.

    The Olympus SP-800UZ is designed for the digicam owner who wants to move up to a 30x zoom with Super Macro. With a feature set that matches up against the likes of the Nikon P100 and Fuji HS10, the Olympus SP-800UZ has some serious competition in the superzoom department.It’s very light weight camera consuidering such a long lens.

    Items Included

    Olympus SP-800UZ digital camera
    LI-50B Lithium-ion battery
    USB-AC adapter
    USB cable
    A/V cable
    Camera strap
    Lens cap and cord
    Quick Start Guide
    Instruction manual and ib software on internal memory
    Warranty card

    This is great camera for the size and price and especially for those photographers who want some great closeups.

  • Lightning Photography Tips

    Posted on April 12th, 2011 Staff Writer

    Trying to shoot lightning can be difficult for photographers, but this article will provide some tips to help you be more successful at capturing great lightning photos. There can be quite a bit a risk involved as lightning is very unpredictable. You are usually out in the open with a tripod, power lines, metal fences and other things that will attract lightning. First and foremost be careful but have fun.


    Weather

    Be sure you know and understand the weather conditions. You don’t want to attempt to photograph lightning in the rain but rather as the storm is in the distance or as it approaches. Unless you love being zapped use all precautions necessary. If you can take your shots from indoors then do it, but if you are an adventurer and want some really good shots then outdoors is the way to go.

    Equipment

    Camera – but of course right, how else will get those great shots. You should be able to set aperture separately

    Tripod – Without a doubt you will need a tripod, a heavy one would be the way to go.

    Cable Shutter Release – To trip the shutter remotely.

    Exposure and Settings

    Set your camera to the lowest ISO speed and shoot RAW. Keep the aperture f/5.6 – f/8 while taking lightning photos. Exposure time all depends on light conditions. When shooting at night, calculate long exposures for you to know the right exposure. When capturing lightning photos during daytime, you can use your camera’s light meter to know the correct exposure. Your lens should also be set on manual focus and focus for infinity because lightning will most likely hit somewhere very far away from your lens.

    The simplest form of lightning photography is done well after sunset, with a dark sky. You find a part of the sky where lightning is happening, aim your camera that way, focus on infinity, set the f-stop, open the shutter with or without)the cable release, this is your choice and then close the shutter after lightning happens. When the sky is dark, there is no limit to how long you can wait with the shutter open.

    These are only a few tips for photographing lightning to consider. Experiment with your shots and don’t give up if its not perfect the first few times. You will eventually get it right.

  • Canon Powershot SX210 Review

    Posted on April 7th, 2011 Staff Writer

    This is a great Canon camera that has a long zoom in a small frame. The 14-megapixel PowerShot SX210 is just that type of camera from Canon. The photo quality is above average to excellent for a camera this size. The amount of noise this camera produces is low which makes this a great camera for beginners. Canon’s PowerShot SX210 captures still images in a choice of 12 JPEG file sizes (including 2 @ 16:9) as well as HD 720p(1280×720) video clips (with stereo sound) up to 60 minutes (or 4GB per clip) as well as 640×480 @ 30 fps and 320×240 @ 30 fps for lower-resolution applications. And when shooting hand-held, walkabout video, the SX210 takes advantage of Canon’s Dynamic mode to dampen the bumps along the way. The SX210 is also available in black, purple and gold versions.

    Compact cameras like these start giving softer images when you go beyond ISO 200 and so did this Canon. The photos will get much softer when you go beyond ISO 400 but still 8×10 inch prints look great on this camera. For hassle-free shooting, Canon’s Smart AUTO mode automatically analyzes the scene and sets the best exposure based on 22 predefined shooting situations. For shooting under low lighting conditions, the ISO sensitivity of the PowerShot SX210 IS can be dialed up to 1600, and when shooting in Low Light mode, expanded as high as an equivalent of ISO 6400.

    The cameras controls aren’t really made for big hands. Canon makes the flash pop up every time you start the camera but you can push it down and it will stay down. With the flash up, the camera is very awkward to hold because you don’t really have anywhere to put your fingers.  This is really the only issue I have found with this camera. Overall this camera ia great camera for the cost.

     

    Items included with this camera:

    Lithium-ion Battery Pack NB-5L

    Battery Charger CB-2LX

    Wrist Strap WS-DC9

    Digital Camera Solution CD-ROM

    USB Interface Cable IFC-400PCU

    AV Cable AVC-DC400

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews The Fuji REAL 3D W3

    Posted on March 22nd, 2011 Staff Writer

    With 3D coming on stronger than ever these days we figure we would bring a review of a nice little 3D camera by Fuji. The W3 isn’t Fuji’s first 3D camera, as the first model didn’t get such a hot reception. This camera is smaller and lighter than the original model with a bigger and better quality screen. The new Fuji W3 adds 3D HD video recording with stereo audio to the formula and the unique ability to shoot video in Real 3D in High Definition, with live or recorded playback via direct connection to any 3D TV.

    The camera’s dual 1/2.3-inch, 10 megapixel CCDs and 3X zoom lenses are carried over from before, but a new design and more user-friendly interface is a great improvement.  The 3D printing technology is ingenious. The Fuji W3 continues the strategy of offering Real 3D content by replicating the human visual system in combining two high quality lens and two CCDs in the one chassis – and allows consumers the option of viewing 3D images and video either with or without special glasses.  It uses a very fine-textured Fresnel lens surface on a thin plastic sheet to produce an auto stereoscopic image.

    Images can also be made into special ‘lenticular’ prints – via a unique printing process. The camera will capture 720p 3D movies and can save both 3D MPO images and 2D JPEGs simultaneously. If you haven’t checked this camera out I would say do it as soon as you can.

    Key features:

    • 3D HD Movie (720p) and 3D still image capture
    • Instant 3D playback on build-in High Contrast, 3.5” 3D LCD (without the need for special 3D glasses)
    • Direct Connection via HDMI high-speed 1.4(Type A-Type C) cable to any branded 3D HDTV
    • Two 1/2.3” 10 Megapixel CCD
    • Two Fujinon 3x optical zoom lens
    • 3D RP(REAL PHOTO) HD PROCESSOR
    • Compact and light-weight 230g body (excluding accessories, battery and memory card)
    • 2D Special effects using Simultaneous Shooting functions
  • Explaining Aperture In Photography

    Posted on March 19th, 2011 Staff Writer

    When you purchase your digital camera if you are like me you pick up the manual and start thumbing through it. You might also come across somewhere in that manual that talks about ‘aperture’. If you are new to photography you might actually ask what aperture is in relationship to your camera. We are going to explain aperture in this article for you and hope it give you a better understanding.

    The main function of a camera lens is to collect light. The size of the diaphragm opening in a camera lens allows light to pass through onto the film inside the camera the moment when the shutter curtain in camera opens during an exposure process. The larger the diameter of the aperture, then more light reaches the image sensor. Aperture is expressed as f-numbers or f-stops. Those numbers you see on the lens like f22 or f/22 or f/8.0 and f/5.6. The smaller the F-stop number, the larger the lens opening on your camera.  A “fast” lens is one that has a large maximum aperture like F2.4 or F2.0.

    A good aperture range is my opinion is somewhere between F1.8 and F16. A larger aperture range will give you more latitude with the kinds of pictures you can shoot. The larger the aperture the better your camera will perform in low light situations and will help negate camera shake. A larger aperture also allows you to use a fast shutter speed for freeze action. Another advantage of a large maximum aperture is to provide a shallow depth of field. This allows the background to blur nicely thus isolating your subject.  A smaller aperture also has its good qualities by using a slow shutter speed which can help show objects in motion.  Another advantage of a small minimum aperture is to increase the depth-of-field. An increased depth-of-field allows you to take landscape pictures where as much of the picture in the foreground and reaching all the way to the background.

    We hope this short article on aperture for digital cameras has helped give you a better understanding.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews The Casio EX-FH20

    Posted on March 6th, 2011 Staff Writer

    The Casio EX-FH20 is the next in line to the FX1, released in early 2008. It’s smaller, lighter, and less expensive as a 9 megapixel camera. The FH20 still offers awesome velocity at 40 frames per second continuous shooting and 1000 fps high speed movie mode. The 9.1 megapixel, CMOS-sensor equipped EX-FH20 meets or exceeds the definition of an ultrazoom camera. The Casio EX-FH20 has a simplified user interface, a significantly lower price tag, a smaller and lighter overall package. The FH20 has the same smaller 1/2.3-inch 9.1-megapixel CMOS as the FC100. It also has a completely different lens. Casio has built memory into the EX-FH20, instead of bundling a memory card. There’s just under 32MB of onboard memory on the FH20, so you will probably want to purchase a larger memory card right away. The EX-FH20 uses four AA batteries for power. They also include a lens cap and retaining strap to protect your lens from harm. It fits tightly which is a good thing.

    What else is included?

    • The 9.1 Megapixel Exilim EX-FH20 digital camera
    • Four AA alkaline batteries
    • Lens cap w/retaining strap
    • Shoulder strap
    • USB cable
    • A/V cable
    • CD-ROM featuring YouTube Uploader, Adobe Reader, and camera manual
    • 33 page Basic Reference Manual + full manual (on CD-ROM)

    This camera is by far and away the most affordable high-speed consumer camera around.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews the Sea & Sea DX-1200HD 12.1 Megapixel Digital Camera

    Posted on February 18th, 2011 Staff Writer

    The Sea & Sea DX-1200HD 12.1 Megapixel Digital Camera is a high efficiency camera with high resolution capabilities and a wide variety of technical features. The new camera & housing have been completely revised and the housing has been designed so even beginners can enjoy taking pictures easily. With the durable plastic waterproof casing, there is no worry that water or sand will get in vital crevices.

    The Sea & Sea DX-1200HD Underwater Digital Camera has a 3 inch LCD monitor, which is the largest monitor of its class for compact digital cameras. This screen allows you to view your pictures down to the smallest detail. The LCD monitor hood and inner hood allows improved water visibility and you can also take pictures while on the move. This underwater digital camera is very lightweight and compact allowing for easy travel and concealment.

    The Sea & Sea DX-1200HD is an overall awesome camera that comes with all the extras you need when diving or on vacation.

    Specs:

    • High definition CCD 1/1.72-inch primary color CCD with 12.19 effective megapixels (maximum number of recording pixels 12.43 megapixels) and 3x optical zoom lens (35 to102 mm).
    • Features SEA&SEA mode, a still image mode for optimal underwater photography.
    • Several White Balance settings available (Auto, Daylight, Cloudy, Fluorescent, Tungsten, Sunset, Custom) to suit any particular scene.
    • Exposure compensation function (±2EV in 0.5EV steps).
    • ISO speed can be set up to ISO 3200.
    • Movie function up to 1280×720 pixels (HD Video) at 30 frames/second (30 fps).
    • 16MB built-in memory. Can record on SD / MMC / SDHC memory cards (up to 8GB).
    • Specially designed lithium-ion battery and battery charger included.
    • When you turn the retractable cable socket lever, the fiber-optic cable socket slides and is aligned with position of the built-in flash and fixed.
    • Flash Light Diffuser function: Effective diffuser that softly diffuses the light of the built-in flash.
    • Strong and durable build, with a depth rating of up to 45m / 150ft.
  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews The Leatherman Core

    Posted on February 5th, 2011 Staff Writer

    If you are looking for an ultimate tool to do your toughest jobs – buy the Leatherman Core. An updated version of the Super Tool 200. The Leatherman Core combines 19 individually rotating tools into one 4.5-inch multi-tool. The Core has our most powerful pliers, longer blades, and easy-to-use locks. Core is the first Leatherman to feature Hollow-Ground Screwdrivers in the standard sizes professionals use. This multi-tool has it all.

    Specifications

    • 420HC Clip Point Knife with Straight Edge
    • 420HC Sheepsfoot Serrated Knife
    • Needlenose Pliers
    • Regular Pliers
    • Wire cutters
    • Hard-wire cutters
    • Stranded-wire cutters
    • Wire Stripper
    • Electrical Crimper
    • 5/16″ Screwdriver
    • 7/32″ Screwdriver
    • 1/8″ Screwdriver
    • Phillips Screwdriver
    • Wood/Metal File
    • Saw
    • Bottle Opener
    • Can Opener
    • 9 in | 22 cm
    • Awl with Thread Loop

    Features:

    • Stainless Steel Handles
    • Stainless Steel Body
    • Black Oxide Version Available
    • All Locking Blades and Tools
    • Comfort-sculpted Handles
    • Leather or Nylon Sheath
    • 25-year Warranty

    Measurements:

    • 4.5 in | 11.5 cm (closed)
    • 10.8 oz | 307 g
    • 3.2 in | 8.13 cm (blade length)

    This is one of the handiest tools I’ve ever used for both work & the outdoors. It has more useful functions than most other type tools.The Leatherman Core is great tool for any job big or small.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews The Surefire G3-BK Nitrolon

    Posted on January 25th, 2011 Staff Writer

    The G3 is a high-output flashlight featuring a tough, corrosion-proof Nitrolon body and bezel. The G3 LED uses a virtually indestructible power-regulated LED and a precision micro-textured reflector to produce a smooth 120-lumen beam. The G3 LED can generate tactical-level light for six hours and useful light levels for an impressive 9.4 hours on a single set of batteries.. Output is either 105 or 200 lumens, depending on which easy-to-install lamp you use—high-output or ultra high-output. The G3 flashlight is great for tactical, self-defense, and general use. The tactically-correct pushbutton tailcap switch provides secure, ergonomic activation control: press for momentary-on, twist for constant-on.

    Other Features

    • Brilliant white light from high-output lamp (included) or ultra high-output lamp (optional)
    • Precision micro-textured reflector creates smooth, optimized beam
    • Coated tempered window resists impact, maximizes light
    • Tough, lightweight Nitrolon® body with deep grid pattern for secure grip
    • Tactical tailcap switch—press for momentary-on, twist for constant-on
    • Weatherproof O-ring and gasket sealing
    • Includes high-energy 123A batteries with 10-year shelf life

    This is a tough and affordable everyday flashlight that will not let you down.

  • 42nd Street Photo Tips – Choosing The Best Memory Card For Your Camera

    Posted on January 15th, 2011 Staff Writer

    We have covered a lot of ground as far as photography tips and camera reviews. Today we are going to talk memory cards for your camera and how to choose the right one. Most digital cameras seem to have one thing in common and that is small internal memory capacity. On the bright side all digital cameras have a card slot that can accept different camera memory cards depending on the manufacturer and model. Purchasing the right video card will allow you to get the most out of your camera. Here are a few tips to help in choosing the best memory card for your camera.

    Know Your Memory Card Type For Your Camera

    Understand your camera and memory card that is compatiable with it. Look to your camera’s manual to find out what memory cards your camera supports so that you know what to get when you purchase online or at your local store.

    Don’t Buy Cheap Memory Cards

    Have you heard the phrase ‘You get what you’ pay for?’ This is true with memory cards as well. Cheap or less known memory cards tend to have lower quality and not so great performance. Name brands like Ridata, Sandisk, Kingston, and Transcend are your best bets. Last, be sure and buy from a reputable seller, preferably a camera store. Fake copies of memory cards can be made so be safe when purchasing memory cards.

    Purchase Fast Memory Cards

    Data transfer speeds of memory cards are important when it comes to performance, you want the highest data transfer speeds you can get. The faster the transfer, the faster you write and read data. This is important when you usually do continuous shots or shoot video. Faster cards are usually more expensive, but if you are shooting action or sports and use a rapid frame rate frequently, then you want the fastest card, and camera, that you can afford. If you take your time to compose each shot then speed may not be as important.

    What’s The Best Size For Your Memory Card?

    Camera memory cards come in several different sizes ranging to the small 512 MB sizes to 8 GB and beyond. The higher the storage capacity, the more photographs you can shoot and keep on the memory card. Camera memory cards are becoming more affordable as the maximum capacity goes up so don’t go cheap as I mentioned earlier. Be sure to consider your camera’s maximum megapixel count and then take a good estimate on how many shots you wish to take per session. If you own a 5.3 megapixel camera, each JPEG shot will be around 1.5 MB each on the highest quality or 8 MB using the RAW format. That means around 680 shots can fit in a 1 GB card or 126 RAW shots. Also keep in mind though that larger capacity is not always good. If the card becomes corrupted you can lose a large amount of data, Be sure to weigh all your options.

    There are many thing to consider when purchasing a memory card but the above tips is a good start.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews Surefire Kroma LED Flashlight K2-BK-BL/RD

    Posted on January 7th, 2011 Staff Writer

    Surefire Kroma LED Flashlight K2-BK-BL/RD The SureFire Kroma LED Flashlight is a palm-sized high-intensity, selectable-output, multi-spectrum LED flashlight for tactical, self-defense, recreational, and general use. The Kroma provides two output levels of white light: a long-running low beam and a brilliant tactical-level high beam with over three times the light of a larger two D-cell flashlight. Red and blue secondary LEDs also feature two output levels suitable for operations requiring minimal light; for preserving night vision while navigating, tracking, map reading, or other close work; or for negotiating outdoor terrain without disturbing wildlife. A rotating selector ring allows for no-look control—just twist to change beam color or output level.

    SureFire flashlights are known around the world as the lighting system for any and every tactical scenario. In 1969, their original product line consisted of laser sighting systems for firearms. After many years of intense research and development, the SureFire Weapon Light was born and low light law enforcement & military operations changed forever. SureFire then went on to establish themselves as the leading manufacturer of rugged, powerful and compact illumination tools for tactical applications; from weapon-mounted lights and laser sights, shield lights, baton lights & hand-held lights powerful and bright enough to qualify as force-multiplier tools that could temporarily blind, unbalance, and disorient a threat.

    Other Features

    • Selectable, dual-output white primary beam and dual-output secondary beams of blue and red
    • Electronically controlled LED light source has no filament to burn out or break, lasts for thousands of hours
    • Total Internal Reflection (TIR) lens produces tightly focused central beam
    • Rugged aerospace-grade aluminum body, Mil-Spec Type III hard anodized in black
    • O-ring sealed, weatherproof
    • Tempered Pyrex® window
    • Heavy-duty pocket clip
    • Tailcap switch: press for momentary-on low beams, press further for momentary-on high white beam; twist for constant-on low or high beams
    • Switch lockout prevents accidental activation during transport or storage
    • Output/Runtimes:

    White high: 50 lumens / 1.5 hrs
    White low: 1.4 lumens / 20 hrs
    Blue high: 3.4 lumens / 8 hrs
    Blue low: .48 lumens / 80 hrs
    Red high: 6.3 lumens / 8 hrs
    Red low: .52 lumens / 80 hrs

    • Batteries included

    This is great flashlight that’s durable and reliable for everyday use.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews The Canon EOS Rebel Digital T2i

    Posted on December 27th, 2010 Staff Writer

    The Canon Rebel T2i is an 18MP DSLR that follows up the popular Canon Rebel T1i. The Canon EOS Rebel T2i incorporates a number of advanced pro-DSLR features in a compact and very affordable camera body. The Rebel T2i handles much like the Rebel T1i; however, the Rebel T2i has a number of subtle changes like new button designs and a new 3:2 format LCD. This is the first Canon DSLR with a display that is actually the same shape of the sensor. The EOS Rebel T2i can also capture full 1080p HD video with monaural sound, or stereo sound when using (optional) 3.5mm external microphones.

    In addition to the camera’s bright eye-level optical reflex viewfinder, the Rebel T2i also features Advanced Live View (with a dedicated Live view/Movie button) for composing and editing your stills and video using the T2i’s 3.0″ Clear View LCD, which contains a whopping 1.04 million dots of resolving power.

    The buttons on the rear of the camera are flatter than they were on the T1i and are easier to use, which almost gives the camera controls on the rear a point and shoot feel.  The Q button on the rear brings up the quick settings display and is very easy and intuitive to navigate using the 4-way controls on the rear panel.

    The Canon EOS Rebel T2i records imagery onto a choice of SD memory card, SDHC memory card, or SDXC Memory Cards and powers off an LP-E8 lithium-ion battery, which is good for up to 550 still exposures or 1 hour and 40 minutes of video recording. The EOS Rebel T2i is compatible with all Canon EF and EF-S optics. For CAEDRT2IK only – The Canon Rebel T2i kit comes with an image stabilized Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS zoom lens, which has an equivalent focal range of a 28.8 – 88mm lens on a full-frame (24x36mm) 35mm camera.

    New Features

    • 18MP CMOS sensor with a 4-channel readout (the 7D has an 8-channel readout)
    • ISO 100-6400 (up to 12,800 with boost)
    • DIGIC 4 Processor
    • 3.7 fps continuous shooting speed (34 high-quality JPEGs, 6 RAW)
    • 9-point auto focus system
    • 63 zone dual layer metering
    • 1080p HD video at 24, 25, and 30 frames per second (fps)
    • 720p HD video at 50 and 60 fps, VGA at 50 and 60 fps
    • manual exposure option in video mode
    • external stereo mic input
    • new movie crop mode
    • new LCD with 3:2 aspect ratio and 1.04 million dot resolution
    • Quick control button
    • SD/SDHC/SDXC cards (adding compatibility with SDXC cards)
    • size/weight: 5.1×3.1×3.0 inches (close to the T1i) weight 18.7 oz
    • Typical battery capacity – 550 shots without flash (430 shots with 50% flash)

    The Canon EOS Rebel Digital T2i makes a great impression.

  • 42nd Street Photo Receives Positive Reviews

    Posted on December 24th, 2010 Staff Writer

    42nd Street Photo reviews have been excellent this past year and put them at the top of recommended camera stores. NexTag, PriceGrabber, and BizRate show consumers giving 42nd Street Photo high marks for customer service and the products they carry.

    A consumer from NexTag says:

    Date: 12/23/10

    “This was my first purchase from 42nd St. Photo. Since they’re in NYC and I’m in Dallas, I wasn’t familiar with them, but like many others, I was looking for a great deal from a seller I could trust. They had the exact camera I wanted, a great price versus other sellers, and had many positive customer reviews. I gave them a shot and got exactly what I hoped for, on time, with no issues at all. No question that I’ll buy from them again.”

    A consumer from Bizrate comments:

    Date: 12-21-2010

    “The gentleman I spoke with was very professional, helpful and polite”

    These are a couple of the comments and excellent feedback for 42nd Street Photo. 42nd Street Photo carries a wide variety of digital cameras, digital audio, and video equipment. We always aim to please our customers, and our history shows it. With over 40 years in the camera industry, we pride ourself in the excellent customer service we provide and the many long term customers who shop at our store. If you’re a camera enthusiast visiting New York for the first time, or if you live in the big apple and have never been to our store, stop by! We’d love to help you. You can also visit us online at 42photo.com