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  • Common Mistakes When Purchasing A Camera

    Posted on July 21st, 2012 Staff Writer

    If you are buying a camera for the first time it’s very easy to make purchasing mistakes without the best information. We are going to cover a few common mistakes to avoid when buying your first camera.

    1. Estimate Your Budget – Figure how much you are going to spend first. If you are going to start with just the purchase of a camera first then do just that. If you are going to buy a camera, bag, tripod, and lens then make sure you are going to make use of them and research these items as well.
    2. Brand Name – Buy a brand name you have heard of and has received a good reviews. Purchasing a camera that doesn’t carry a brand name is probably cheaper but I am sure you have heard the saying ‘You get what you pay for’ this is especially true with cameras.
    3. Test the Camera – Before making the purchase ask the sales representative if you can take a few shots with the camera and get a feel for it. Make sure the camera is not too bulky or to thin and that the other features are easily accessible for you and user friendly.
    4. Specifications – Don’t focus too much on the specifications. The difference between a camera with 10 megapixels and one with 8 megapixels is not big of a deal. This also goes with zoom features; try not to get to wrapped up in these as this can cause you to make the wrong purchase.
    5. Camera Terms – Be sure you understand your basic camera terms. Take in as much photography terms and read about photography. This way you will understand the specification you are reading about or listening to coming from a sales representative.

    I hope these few tips help you or put you at ease when purchasing your first camera. If you are looking for a great deal on a camera be sure and stop by http://www. 42photo.com

  • Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Memory Card

    Posted on June 13th, 2012 Staff Writer

    Along with the camera, lens, battery and other essential equipment, your memory card for your digital camera is just as important.  As a photographer it is your responsibility to give proper care to your memory card so that there is no malfunction during your sessions.  There are a few tips that are suggested to help with this process.

    1. Try not to delete your work directly from the memory card.  Instead it is best to delete the photographs from your computer rather than your camera.  The reasoning for this is when images are deleted from your computer, it is allowing for one erase cycle.  This process can actually prolong the use of your memory card.
    2. Periodically format your memory cards.  This process will help get unwanted files and material of your memory card and all for a better storage and use of your images.  It is best to do this after uploading all images safely to your computer.
    3. When removing your memory card from your camera, it is recommended to turn your camera off before removing the card.  Although manufactures have guaranteed that this process isn’t exactly necessary, it is wise to avoid any damage to your card.
    4. Always have a backup of the same caliber.  It is never wrong to be over prepared with equipment.  If possible carry one or two extra memory cards in your case just in case something should go wrong.  Other than to help if something does go wrong, it is also best to have extras if you fill up one card with images.  Make sure you store the extra memory cards in a safe environment with adequate temperature.

    Just like the rest of your equipment, the memory card is essential and requires routine care for roper usage.  When researching memory card types, don’t just review their storage capacity but as well as previous users reviews.

  • The Basics of Shutter Speed

    Posted on May 31st, 2012 Staff Writer

    First let’s review the basic terminology and aspect of the cameras shutter speed.  Located directly in front of the sensor inside the camera is a small flap called the shutter.  This small flap opens and closes to allow light to reach the sensor when a photograph is taken.  The shutter speed describes how quickly and how slow the shutter opens and closes.  The basic rule to remember is that a fast shutter speed then the short amount of time the shutter is open; and the slower the shutter speed the longer the shutter stays open.

    Choosing the best shutter speed is a tricky part of capturing a photograph and it takes practice as well as some knowledge on how to accomplish this task.  Most cameras come with an automatic mode and allows the camera to “guess” the right speed for your photograph.  However, this isn’t always the right speed and your photograph can end up being blurred or poorly exposed.  To prevent this from happening it is best to switch the manual mode so that you can control the exact shutter speed needed.  When doing so there are a few factors you should consider, such as:

    Camera shake;  you may think you have the steadiest of hands but with even the slightest movement a photograph can turn up blurred or lacking sharpness.  The best way to avoid such photographs is to use a faster shutter speed.  If you are using a longer lens it is best to use a faster shutter speed as well.  If need be use a tripod to guarantee your camera remains still and to avoid inappropriate pictures.

    Motion blurring happens when you are photographing a moving object, like a car or plane.  If you are using a slower shutter speed, then the object will move through the frame as the shutter is still open.  The best option is to use a faster shutter speed to avoid any blurry photographs.

    It is also wise to make sure that your desired location has an ample amount of lighting.  The shutter speed is not just about how fast your shutter opens and closes but as well as the amount of light you are allowing to enter. It is best to choose a shutter speed that is allowing the right amount of light to enter the camera.  It is recommended to practice and take several pictures with different shutter speeds until you find the right one.

    Practice makes perfect and if you continue to experiment with different shutter speeds, lighting, and techniques as well as become familiar with your equipment, then you can master the skill of shutter speed.

  • What is ISO?

    Posted on May 28th, 2012 Staff Writer

    Throughout many articles you have read along with the experience you have reached, there has been many mentions of ISO and your digital camera.  So what is ISO and how does it relate to your digital camera.  ISO is your cameras sensitivity to light measurement.  In other words the higher the ISO number is, the more sensitive the sensor.

    For example, if you are capturing an image with minimal lighting it is best to have a high ISO setting.  Your digital camera’s ISO setting determines the sensitivity to light that your sensor has.  Therefore, having a high ISO in low light environments means the more light that will be captured in your photograph.

    It is best before capturing a photograph to experiment with different light settings and your ISO setting.  Many photographs taken with minimal light don’t capture the essences of the photograph.  This could be in part to a poor ISO setting.  There is nothing wrong with experimenting and finding the optimal ISO setting for your environment.

    Most manufactures like to raise the ISO setting of a camera far more than what is advertised, so the best thing to do if you want high quality photographs in low lighting is to research your camera or buy a DSLR.   But, the most effective way to find the ISO setting right for you is to experiment with the camera and environment.

  • The Right Equipment for the Right Photographer

    Posted on March 16th, 2012 Staff Writer

    When purchasing your photography equipment there is a bit of excitement and awe of your new life line.  You spend hours even days becoming familiar with your equipment, settings, and lenses and take pride in the new piece.  Then you are aware of new equipment on the market and fear you do not have the quality as the new equipment for your photographs.  Rest assure, that before you jump up to by the new equipment there are a few things you can do to match these upgraded qualities.

    First, compare your old with the new equipment and find out specifically what has changed.  In every new piece of equipment the specifications seem better or more reliable, but with technology today the simplest solution could be to upgrade your old camera.  If you need more memory, you can simple purchase a larger memory from your local technology store.  Become clear of what is making this new camera so special.

    Second, most new equipment are being advertised with special features that can change the aspect of the picture to something elaborate.  If this type of photographs peaks your interest then explore your editing program to find if this program can accommodate your desire.  If you check with the manufacture or programmer of your software, sometimes they can give you upgrades to your program.  Sometimes the simplest and cost efficient way of solving a problem is right in your program.

    Third, taking several trips to your local camera store can give a lot of insight into the new equipment out there.  If they have the new equipment, experiment with it in the store and get a feel as to what it offers.  If you just absolutely have to have the new equipment, ask the store clerk if they do trade in.

    The first thing about being a photographer is to remember that the camera is not the sole reason behind a great photo, it is the photographer.  Once you find equipment you are comfortable with, then perhaps you should remain with the equipment and just upgrade when needed.

  • Tips for Saving a Camera Dropped on a Hard Surface or Submerged in Water

    Posted on January 21st, 2012 Staff Writer

    Most cameras are not built for high impact or to be dropped in water. You can purchase such cameras but they don’t really shoot the high quality photos that a photographer wants or needs. If you own a camera that is not water or impact resistant you need to take extra care of your camera when you are out shooting. Depending where you drop your camera and where the impact occurs can have adverse effects on different parts of the camera. Dropping your camera in the water more than likely this will cause complete loss in functionality. Here are a few tips to use if you drop your camera or if it’s submerged in water.

    Camera Dropped on Hard Surface

    If your camera is dropped on a hard surface the first thing you need to do is check the condition the physical condition of the camera. Check to make sure there are no dents, scratches, cracks or broken parts on the camera. Next you want to check the condition of the lens. If the camera was OFF when it hit the ground the body may have protected the lens if it’s not a DSLR. If the camera was ON then take a look at the lens. If the lens has been broken, scratched or cracked then you will need to take it in for repair.

    After checking the lens the next step is to check that the camera is still functional.  Try turning the camera on and check all functionality. Be sure and check the zoom to see it’s stuck or moves in an irregular motion. Also check to see if the lens was possibly bent. This might be an easy fix without much effort. Last try shooting off a few photos and make sure everything works correctly and there is no abnormalities in your photos. If the camera no longer turns ON or some on the functions do not work properly then take it in for repair.

    Camera Dropped in Water

    If your camera is dropped in water when the camera is ON more than likely the camera is done. You will probably have to go buy a new camera. If the camera was turned OFF then dry off the camera and remove the batteries and memory card. More than likely water has reached all circuits and the sensor. You can try drying the camera out with a hair dryer and then letting it sit for a week or so to let all water evaporate. Afterwards with batteries and memory still out take the camera in for repair.

    It’s hard to save a damaged camera and you will probably have to take the camera in for repair. Use your camera carefully and try to avoid these type of accidents.

  • Tips for Protecting Your Camera During Cold Weather

    Posted on December 12th, 2011 Staff Writer

    When using an outside setting for your photographs can be fun and exciting, it is very important to take care of your camera in cold weather.  Most digital cameras’ default settings can be adjusted to compensate for the weather but some cannot.  Here are a few helpful tips to avoid damaging your camera and capturing unwanted photographs.

    Keep your batteries and camera warm.  Some photographers don’t even put batteries in until it is time to photograph.  To conserve batteries, turn of any extra feature such as the LCD to save energy.  Also keep a spare of batteries in your pocket close to your body.

    Place your camera in a plastic bag to avoid any potential condensation from developing on the camera lens.  If the camera is in the plastic bag, take it out for photos then immediately place back in the bag for safety.  This will prevent the camera from appearing “Foggy”.  If condensation does form, immediately stop using the camera, remove the batteries, lens cap, and memory card

    Once the photographer has returned home, immediately give the camera time to adjust to the temperature change.  Place the camera in an unheated room for about 30 minutes.  Also keep the camera in the camera bag to minimize any condensation.

    These are just a few tips for protecting your camera during the cold weather months.

  • 42nd Street Photo’s Tips for Taking Great Pictures

    Posted on July 23rd, 2011 Staff Writer

    Ever asked how some people take the most perfect photographs? Would you to like to become a better photographer? We are going to cover a few tips that will help you do just that.

    Light – Light is important in every picture. It will affect your photo in every way. For natural light we suggest early morning or late evening. If you have to be out during the day its best to have the sun at your back.

    Direct Eye Contact – This can be as important as light when photographing your subject. Try to be ay there level and capture those great smiles. This adds more of a personal feeling in the picture.

    Background – Put a background behind the subject that isn’t cluttered. Use something simple that will allow the subject to stand out.

    Settings – Understand the settings on your camera. Read through your manual, this will help ion the long run to get those photographs you always wanted.

    Flash When Outdoors – This might sound crazy for those of you that have never tried this. Using the flash outdoors will eliminate shadows. This will help the person stand out in your picture.
    We hope these few tips get you going in the right direction. Remember don’t be shy about taking picture. Let your digital camera loose and take as many pictures as you can. You start getting it right as you go.

  • 42nd Street Photo’s Poolside Photography Tips

    Posted on July 7th, 2011 Staff Writer

    The summer is here and the temperatures are hot. More than likely at some point this summer you will probably find yourself at a poll of your own or with friends. This also provides a great chance to take some great photo with your digital camera. Here are a few tips to try out when poolside and you are snapping shots.

    • Understand your digital camera, read your manual, play with the settings
    • Batteries and memory cards. Make sure your batteries are new or charged and you have plenty of room on your memory cards
    • Keep your camera stores when not using it. Be sure you have a case or a bag to place your camera in when not using it. Keep out of the sun and away from the water
    • Beware of the sun, natural light is great but when at the pool try and get the sun behind you. Understand your ISO settings will also help when there is a lot of sun.
    • Take a lot of photos, you can’t go wrong here. Not all your photos are going to be perfect so take as many photos as you can.
    • Make sure you have stable footing and a good foundation; you don’t want to find yourself and your camera in the pool.

    We do hope you have a great summer and take some great photos. Thanks for stopping by.

  • Digital Cameras and Megapixels – Is More Always Better?

    Posted on June 24th, 2011 Staff Writer

    Earlier in the 21st century as digital cameras were really starting to get popular resolution like megapixels was more important than it is now. Low resolution usually meant smaller prints and not so sharp an image. Things have changed though and a higher megapixel number is not always better.

    First let’s discuss what a megapixel actually is. A megapixel is one million pixels and a pixel is a single point or dot on a graphic image. If your camera is 8 megapixels, it means that any pictures it takes on the highest quality setting will consist of 8 million of these pixels. Somewhere around 5 megapixels will give you good quality 8×10 shots. Most people think that a higher pixel rating will give you better pictures and that is not true. The higher megapixel camera merely contains more pixels and a higher resolution in the photos it takes, but it’s not necessarily any sharper than a lower megapixel camera. This is a great theory but actually this creates a terrible photo with more dots. There are many factors that affect the quality of the shot besides the megapixels.

    Other factors to consider besides megapixels are sensor size, type of camera, and quality of the camera. Image noise and ISO also will factor into your shots. There is no real advantage to having a 12 megapixel digital camera and the pixels will actually make your photo less attractive when image noise comes into play. The more megapixels you add to a sensor the more densely they are packed together which will result in image noise and unclear shots. Once you get past 7 or 8 pixels in a point and shoot camera most sensors are struggling to keep up.

    The best cameras all use larger sensors but in turn they are much more expensive and fall in the category of DSLR. These larger sensors produce less image noise which results in a much clearer shot. These cameras also usually have a higher ISO setting which also contributes to a better photo. When are out looking at point and shoot cameras keep these facts in mind, compare sensor sizes to the megapixel rating. In the end you could be saving yourself quite a bit of money.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews The Fuji REAL 3D W3

    Posted on March 22nd, 2011 Staff Writer

    With 3D coming on stronger than ever these days we figure we would bring a review of a nice little 3D camera by Fuji. The W3 isn’t Fuji’s first 3D camera, as the first model didn’t get such a hot reception. This camera is smaller and lighter than the original model with a bigger and better quality screen. The new Fuji W3 adds 3D HD video recording with stereo audio to the formula and the unique ability to shoot video in Real 3D in High Definition, with live or recorded playback via direct connection to any 3D TV.

    The camera’s dual 1/2.3-inch, 10 megapixel CCDs and 3X zoom lenses are carried over from before, but a new design and more user-friendly interface is a great improvement.  The 3D printing technology is ingenious. The Fuji W3 continues the strategy of offering Real 3D content by replicating the human visual system in combining two high quality lens and two CCDs in the one chassis – and allows consumers the option of viewing 3D images and video either with or without special glasses.  It uses a very fine-textured Fresnel lens surface on a thin plastic sheet to produce an auto stereoscopic image.

    Images can also be made into special ‘lenticular’ prints – via a unique printing process. The camera will capture 720p 3D movies and can save both 3D MPO images and 2D JPEGs simultaneously. If you haven’t checked this camera out I would say do it as soon as you can.

    Key features:

    • 3D HD Movie (720p) and 3D still image capture
    • Instant 3D playback on build-in High Contrast, 3.5” 3D LCD (without the need for special 3D glasses)
    • Direct Connection via HDMI high-speed 1.4(Type A-Type C) cable to any branded 3D HDTV
    • Two 1/2.3” 10 Megapixel CCD
    • Two Fujinon 3x optical zoom lens
    • 3D RP(REAL PHOTO) HD PROCESSOR
    • Compact and light-weight 230g body (excluding accessories, battery and memory card)
    • 2D Special effects using Simultaneous Shooting functions
  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews the Sea & Sea DX-1200HD 12.1 Megapixel Digital Camera

    Posted on February 18th, 2011 Staff Writer

    The Sea & Sea DX-1200HD 12.1 Megapixel Digital Camera is a high efficiency camera with high resolution capabilities and a wide variety of technical features. The new camera & housing have been completely revised and the housing has been designed so even beginners can enjoy taking pictures easily. With the durable plastic waterproof casing, there is no worry that water or sand will get in vital crevices.

    The Sea & Sea DX-1200HD Underwater Digital Camera has a 3 inch LCD monitor, which is the largest monitor of its class for compact digital cameras. This screen allows you to view your pictures down to the smallest detail. The LCD monitor hood and inner hood allows improved water visibility and you can also take pictures while on the move. This underwater digital camera is very lightweight and compact allowing for easy travel and concealment.

    The Sea & Sea DX-1200HD is an overall awesome camera that comes with all the extras you need when diving or on vacation.

    Specs:

    • High definition CCD 1/1.72-inch primary color CCD with 12.19 effective megapixels (maximum number of recording pixels 12.43 megapixels) and 3x optical zoom lens (35 to102 mm).
    • Features SEA&SEA mode, a still image mode for optimal underwater photography.
    • Several White Balance settings available (Auto, Daylight, Cloudy, Fluorescent, Tungsten, Sunset, Custom) to suit any particular scene.
    • Exposure compensation function (±2EV in 0.5EV steps).
    • ISO speed can be set up to ISO 3200.
    • Movie function up to 1280×720 pixels (HD Video) at 30 frames/second (30 fps).
    • 16MB built-in memory. Can record on SD / MMC / SDHC memory cards (up to 8GB).
    • Specially designed lithium-ion battery and battery charger included.
    • When you turn the retractable cable socket lever, the fiber-optic cable socket slides and is aligned with position of the built-in flash and fixed.
    • Flash Light Diffuser function: Effective diffuser that softly diffuses the light of the built-in flash.
    • Strong and durable build, with a depth rating of up to 45m / 150ft.
  • 42nd Street Photo Tips – Choosing The Best Memory Card For Your Camera

    Posted on January 15th, 2011 Staff Writer

    We have covered a lot of ground as far as photography tips and camera reviews. Today we are going to talk memory cards for your camera and how to choose the right one. Most digital cameras seem to have one thing in common and that is small internal memory capacity. On the bright side all digital cameras have a card slot that can accept different camera memory cards depending on the manufacturer and model. Purchasing the right video card will allow you to get the most out of your camera. Here are a few tips to help in choosing the best memory card for your camera.

    Know Your Memory Card Type For Your Camera

    Understand your camera and memory card that is compatiable with it. Look to your camera’s manual to find out what memory cards your camera supports so that you know what to get when you purchase online or at your local store.

    Don’t Buy Cheap Memory Cards

    Have you heard the phrase ‘You get what you’ pay for?’ This is true with memory cards as well. Cheap or less known memory cards tend to have lower quality and not so great performance. Name brands like Ridata, Sandisk, Kingston, and Transcend are your best bets. Last, be sure and buy from a reputable seller, preferably a camera store. Fake copies of memory cards can be made so be safe when purchasing memory cards.

    Purchase Fast Memory Cards

    Data transfer speeds of memory cards are important when it comes to performance, you want the highest data transfer speeds you can get. The faster the transfer, the faster you write and read data. This is important when you usually do continuous shots or shoot video. Faster cards are usually more expensive, but if you are shooting action or sports and use a rapid frame rate frequently, then you want the fastest card, and camera, that you can afford. If you take your time to compose each shot then speed may not be as important.

    What’s The Best Size For Your Memory Card?

    Camera memory cards come in several different sizes ranging to the small 512 MB sizes to 8 GB and beyond. The higher the storage capacity, the more photographs you can shoot and keep on the memory card. Camera memory cards are becoming more affordable as the maximum capacity goes up so don’t go cheap as I mentioned earlier. Be sure to consider your camera’s maximum megapixel count and then take a good estimate on how many shots you wish to take per session. If you own a 5.3 megapixel camera, each JPEG shot will be around 1.5 MB each on the highest quality or 8 MB using the RAW format. That means around 680 shots can fit in a 1 GB card or 126 RAW shots. Also keep in mind though that larger capacity is not always good. If the card becomes corrupted you can lose a large amount of data, Be sure to weigh all your options.

    There are many thing to consider when purchasing a memory card but the above tips is a good start.

  • 42nd Street Photo Reviews The Canon EOS Rebel Digital T2i

    Posted on December 27th, 2010 Staff Writer

    The Canon Rebel T2i is an 18MP DSLR that follows up the popular Canon Rebel T1i. The Canon EOS Rebel T2i incorporates a number of advanced pro-DSLR features in a compact and very affordable camera body. The Rebel T2i handles much like the Rebel T1i; however, the Rebel T2i has a number of subtle changes like new button designs and a new 3:2 format LCD. This is the first Canon DSLR with a display that is actually the same shape of the sensor. The EOS Rebel T2i can also capture full 1080p HD video with monaural sound, or stereo sound when using (optional) 3.5mm external microphones.

    In addition to the camera’s bright eye-level optical reflex viewfinder, the Rebel T2i also features Advanced Live View (with a dedicated Live view/Movie button) for composing and editing your stills and video using the T2i’s 3.0″ Clear View LCD, which contains a whopping 1.04 million dots of resolving power.

    The buttons on the rear of the camera are flatter than they were on the T1i and are easier to use, which almost gives the camera controls on the rear a point and shoot feel.  The Q button on the rear brings up the quick settings display and is very easy and intuitive to navigate using the 4-way controls on the rear panel.

    The Canon EOS Rebel T2i records imagery onto a choice of SD memory card, SDHC memory card, or SDXC Memory Cards and powers off an LP-E8 lithium-ion battery, which is good for up to 550 still exposures or 1 hour and 40 minutes of video recording. The EOS Rebel T2i is compatible with all Canon EF and EF-S optics. For CAEDRT2IK only – The Canon Rebel T2i kit comes with an image stabilized Canon EF-S 18-55mm IS zoom lens, which has an equivalent focal range of a 28.8 – 88mm lens on a full-frame (24x36mm) 35mm camera.

    New Features

    • 18MP CMOS sensor with a 4-channel readout (the 7D has an 8-channel readout)
    • ISO 100-6400 (up to 12,800 with boost)
    • DIGIC 4 Processor
    • 3.7 fps continuous shooting speed (34 high-quality JPEGs, 6 RAW)
    • 9-point auto focus system
    • 63 zone dual layer metering
    • 1080p HD video at 24, 25, and 30 frames per second (fps)
    • 720p HD video at 50 and 60 fps, VGA at 50 and 60 fps
    • manual exposure option in video mode
    • external stereo mic input
    • new movie crop mode
    • new LCD with 3:2 aspect ratio and 1.04 million dot resolution
    • Quick control button
    • SD/SDHC/SDXC cards (adding compatibility with SDXC cards)
    • size/weight: 5.1×3.1×3.0 inches (close to the T1i) weight 18.7 oz
    • Typical battery capacity – 550 shots without flash (430 shots with 50% flash)

    The Canon EOS Rebel Digital T2i makes a great impression.

  • 42nd Street Photo recommends the Canon Powershot S95

    Posted on December 20th, 2010 Staff Writer

    Canon Powershot S95If you are looking for a camera with the best photo quality without picking a full-fledged DSLR then the Canon Powershot S95 is what you are looking for. The Canon Powershot S95 is the predecessor to Canon Powershot S90. This digital camera carries some features that would become valuable information for many photography enthusiasts. This is probably the best point-and-shoot camera on the market today for taking photos. The Canon PowerShot S95 is a compact designed 10 megapixel digital camera with HD video and RAW support. The new Canon Powershot S95 does 720P HD recording, a huge improvement over the S90, which didn’t of course. One drawback is that during video recording the use isn’t able to zoom in/out nor focus.

    The fast f/2.0 lens of the Canon PowerShot S95 camera allows the user to shoot without a tripod or flash in darker conditions. The ability to shoot at higher ISO speeds and maintain high image quality is another key feature of the Canon PowerShot S95 digital camera. Not only can you capture photos from ISO 80 up to ISO 3200, you can choose the degree of control you want (from total control to total automatic) over exposure, white balance, focus, and much more, from an extensive menu.  You can automatically produce High Dynamic Range, panoramic, fisheye, low-light and many more specialized photos with built-in programs. The HS System is a powerful combination of high-sensitivity sensor coupled with the latest DIGIC 4 image processor for outstanding image quality in a wide variety of lighting conditions, including low light.

    Specifications:

    Image Sensor: 10.0 million effective pixels.
    Metering: Evaluative, centre-weighted average, spot.
    Sensor Size: 14.9mm CCD.
    Lens: Canon f2.0-4.9/6.0-22.5mm (28-105mm as 35 SLR equivalent).
    Shutter Speed: 15 to 1/1600 second.
    Continuous Shooting: 0.8 to 1.9 images/second.
    Memory: SD, SDHC, SDXC, MMC, MMCplus, HC MMC plus cards.
    Image Sizes (pixels): 3648×2736 to 640×360. Movies: 1280×720, 640×480, 320×240 at 30 fps.
    LCD Screen: 7.6cm LCD (461,000 pixels).
    File Formats: RAW, JPEG, RAW+JPEG, Motion JPEG.
    ISO Sensitivity: Auto, 80 to 3200.
    Interface: USB 2.0, HDMI mini, AV.
    Power: Rechargeable lithium ion battery, DC input.
    Dimensions: 99.8×58.4×29.5 WHDmm.
    Weight: Approx. 193 g (inc battery and card).

    The S95 is a simple point-and-shoot camera, and it’s a serious image-making machine.

  • 42nd Street Photo recommends the Nikon Coolpix P7000 10.1 Megapixel Digital Camera

    Posted on November 30th, 2010 Staff Writer

    Nikon Coolpix P7000If you’re a serious photographer looking for SLR-inspired creative control but in a smaller form, the P7000 is your kind of camera. The Nikon COOLPIX P7000 is a compact, high-performance digital camera offering superb image quality and precise imaging control. The Nikon P7000 is an entirely new design inside and out from its predecessor, the interesting but flawed P6000. Where this Nikon really shines is when you switch it over to manual mode for composing more advanced shots. You choose the aperture, shutter speed, ISO sensitivity, and focus settings to give your images the exact look you want. The P7000 puts those important controls at your fingertips.

    Sporting a 1/1.17-inch, 10.1-megapixel CCD image sensor that rolls back the MP rating from the P6000 (which used a 13.5-megapixel chip), the Nikon P7000 is aiming to improve image quality through a “less is more” approach. The Nikon Coolpix P7000 also boasts an optically stabilized 7.1x zoom lens with a focal length range equivalent to 28-200mm on a 35mm camera. The Coolpix P7000 features Nikon’s EXPEED C2 image processor, which allows an ISO sensitivity range of 100 to 6,400 equivalents at full resolution.

    Other Features

    • 7.1x Wide-Angle Optical Zoom-NIKKOR ED Glass Lens – Versatile 28-200mm lens ranges wide to capture landscapes, zooms in to get close to the action. In the NIKKOR tradition of precision optics, the high-quality ED glass lens delivers superb color and razor-sharp results.
    • 10.1-megapixel, large 1/1.7-inch CCD sensor for stunning images.
    • Optical VR Image Stabilization by lens shift minimizes the effects of camera shake.
    • Hybrid VR Image stabilization by lens shift and electronic VR.
    • Motion Detection automatically detects moving subjects and adjusts shutter speed and ISO to compensate for camera shake and subject movement.
    • High ISO up to 6400 at full resolution for optimum results when shooting in low light or photographing fast-moving subjects.
    • Nikons Best Shot Selector (BSS) automatically takes up to ten shots while the shutter is pressed, then selects and saves the sharpest image
    • EXPEED C2 continues to expand the possibilities of photography with improved levels of image quality, fine detail and processing speed. Custom-optimized for each COOLPIX model, Nikon’s renowned digital image processing engine ensures outstanding images
    • Dial controls for key functions including ISO, white balance, bracketing, exposure compensation and more
    • PSAM (Program, Shutter, Aperture, Manual) exposure control, custom function control.
    • ISO can be set as high as 6400 at full resolution; 12,800 in Low noise Night Mode (3-Megapixel).
    • Tone Level Information provides photographers with 9 levels of grey scale information about the scene for fine exposure analysis according to user’s creative needs.
    • In-camera editing functions include Exposure Compensation, COOLPIX Picture Control, Noise Reduction Filter, Quick Retouch, D-Lighting and Active D-Lighting.
    • Electronic Virtual Horizon Display enables precise leveling of the camera in landscape or portrait orientation during LCD monitor shooting.
    • COOLPIX Picture Control can be customized for Image Sharpening, Contrast, Saturation, Filter Effects, and Tone.
    • Ultra-fast start-up, autofocus and shooting.
    • Subject Tracking tracks a moving subject to ensure sharp focus.
    • Shoot Continuously up to 45 pictures at approx. 1.3 fps at full resolution.
    • Interval Timer Shooting captures images at specified time intervals
    • 3-inch Ultra-High Resolution (921,000-dot) Clear Color Display for still images and movies that come alive with rich detail and improved contrast. The large LCD’s wide viewing angle and anti-glare coating make it easy to compose, view and share pictures.
    • Large Optical viewfinder with diopter adjustment dial.
    • Remote control operation with optional wireless ML-L3.
    • Optional Wide Angle Converter (WC-E75A) for 21mm coverage (requires UR-E22 adapter ring)
    • HD (720p) Movie with Stereo, Mic Input Jack and HDMI Output Records at 24 fps with Zoom, Autofocus and stereo sound. Mic Input Jack allows for optional microphone to be used during recording and HDMI output allows easy in-camera playback or convenient playback on HD-TV or computer.
    • Smile Timer automatically releases the shutter when your subject smiles.
    • In-Camera Red-Eye Fix automatically corrects most instances of red-eye as you shoot. You may never see red-eye again.
    • Face-Priority AF. Nikon’s face-finding technology automatically detects up to 12 faces.
    • Skin Softening smoothes skin tones at three different levels for optimal portraits; can be applied while shooting or during playback.
    • Blink Warning alerts you if a subject has blinked.
    • Built-in Flash plus i-TTL Flash function when used with optional Nikon Speedlight System.
    • 18 Scene Modes, including Scene Auto Selector for optimized shooting in a variety of settings and situations.
    • Scene Auto Selector automatically recognizes the scene you’re shooting and selects the most appropriate scene mode; offers six scene modes plus auto.
    • Macro shooting as close as 0.8 inches.

    The Nikon Coolpix P7000 is a great compact digital camera. Users can take great pictures with this Nikon compact digital camera.

  • How to take better baby photos

    Posted on October 2nd, 2010 Staff Writer

    All parents want to take fantastic photos of their kids. Parents want professional looking photos without have to pay a fortune. You just get one chance to get those perfect shots of your baby before he or she grows up. Let’s face it, nobody wants to show the world a pink, shriveled face bathed in bad light. Here are some tips on getting great pictures.

    Lighting is everything.  The best lighting is natural sunlight, preferably on a slightly cloudy day. I would say the best time is early in the morning or late in the evening right before the sun sets  If it is too bright out, you will get shadows and possibly a little one with squinty eyes. Remember to use your flash for fill flash outside. This lighting produces stunning results.

    Get closer to your child. Fill the frame with your baby’s face and leave out the lamps and furniture and all of that other visual clutter. A good close-up of a baby can be other-worldly. Be sure and get down on there level. You don’t want to have a hundred pictures of your baby looking up.

    Keep the background as simple as possible. It’s harder than it sounds, most photographers spend half there time trying to find a simple background.

    Try and capture action. A baby sprawled on the blanket in my opinion is to ordinary. Capture the moment of your child doing something like yawning, crawling, playing with toys or whatever it might be.

    Take lots of pictures. Don’t be afraid to keep snapping off shots. The more pictures taken the more choices you have to look at to see what was the best shot. Take tons of pictures of your baby and you will find one or two awesome ones in the batch. Digital cameras today can store a massive amount of photos, so let the picture taking rip.

    We hope these few tips we have provided help when shooting photos of your children.

  • 42nd Street Photo recommends the Olympus SP-590UZ 12.0 Megapixel Digital Camera

    Posted on September 18th, 2010 Staff Writer

    Olympus SP-590UZ 12.0 Megapixel Digital Camera Olympus has rewritten the rule book for how powerful a point-and-shoot camera’s zoom can be with the launch of the new 26x optical zoom SP-590 Ultra Zoom. Its extremely versatile zoom lens can capture extraordinary images at virtually any distance–from a delicate flower close up to wide-angle photographs of friends posing before the vast Grand Canyon, or even images shot from the back row of the stadium that look like they were taken courtside.

    Olympus offers a new option for those seeking the ease of a compact digital with the control of an SLR. At the time of its introduction (February 2009) the 26x optical zoom lens is the largest lens available on a compact digital camera. With a focal length equivalent to 26-676mm on a 35mm camera it has both wide angle and extreme telephoto capabilities. With a focal length equivalent to 26-676mm on a 35mm camera it has both wide angle and extreme telephoto capabilities. The SP-590 UZ also has a full set of manual exposure controls including aperture priority and shutter priority. Manual focusing is available too. In super macro mode you can get in as close as 1cm from your subject.

    The SP-590 UZ looks like a mini-DSLR, following the design trend that has largely characterized the ultrazoom class since at least back in the days when 10x represented the high water mark for zoom multiplication. The composite matte black body is punctuated with a brushed silver metal barrel that encases the lens. This is a beautiful camera and worth the price.

    Features:

    • 12-megapixel resolution for photo-quality, poster-size prints
    • 26x wide-angle optical dual image stabilized zoom
    • Pre-capture scene modes: Multiple Exposure, Soft Background Focus and Beauty Mode
    • 2.7-inch Advanced HyperCrystal III LCD screen
    • Compatible with xD Picture Cards and microSD memory cards (not included)
  • Summer and Your Digital Camera

    Posted on August 10th, 2010 Staff Writer

    Summer is here and that presents many photo opportunities and these are usually outdoors and you might even find yourself at the beach. Heat and sand can easily damage your digital camera if you don’t take the correct precautions. Remember that at the beach, your most loved photographic equipment is exposed not only to sand and water but also to heat and salt. These elements are not good for the camera so make sure to keep them away from the device at all times.

    If you take your camera to the beach I would suggest wrapping it in something like a zip-lock bag and then a towel. When you take your camera out to get some shots do not leave it on the sand. The mixture of the sand, heat, and salt can do extensive damage to your camera.

    If you’re a hobbyist and are heading to the beach avoid changing lenses while you’re already at the beach so you don’t expose them to sand. If you must change the lens then go to your car or any enclosed area or in a car park where you’ll be away from sand that could be blown by the wind.

    Make sure to clean your bag as well when you get home. Giving it a vacuum is the best way to get rid of sand.These are just a few tips you might think about if you are heading to the beach with your digital camera.

  • Grab the Nikon D3000 10.2 Megapixel Camera W/ 18-55mm VR Lens & 55-200mm VR

    Posted on June 24th, 2010 Staff Writer

    Nikon D3000

    The Nikon D3000 is a beginner-friendly digital SLR featuring a 10.2 megapixel DX-format sensor, 3.0 inch LCD, and Guide Modes for tips on making adjustments for a variety of shooting situations. Compact and capable, the D3000 is compatible with a broad range of world-famous Nikkor lenses and includes the versatile 3x, 18-55mm Zoom-Nikkor with Silent-Wave Motor auto-focusing and Nikon VR image stabilization to combat picture blur caused by camera shake for sharper hand-held pictures. The D3000′s split-second shutter response eliminates the annoyance of shutter lag. To further simplify picture-taking in special situations such as portraits, sports, landscapes, and more, the D3000 features icon-identified Scene Modes that deliver beautiful results automatically in otherwise complex situations. Additionally, the camera encloses Trim, Red-eye Correction, Soft Filter and many more functionalities that help you capture snaps in detail.

    Other Features:

    • 10.2-Megapixel DX-format Imaging Sensor – Delivers extraordinary image quality for breathtaking prints up to 20 x 30 inches.
    • Includes 3x 18-55mm Zoom-NIKKOR VR Image Stabilization Lens – Legendary NIKKOR optical quality and fast, accurate autofocus means vivid color, striking contrast and crisp detail, while VR image stabilization assures your sharpest pictures ever.
    • Nikon’s Smallest D-SLR
    • Split-second Shutter Response – Eliminates the frustration of shutter delay, capturing moments that other cameras miss.
    • Continuous Shooting up to 3 Frames-Per-Second – Capture fast action, precious moments and fleeting expressions confidently.
    • In-camera Image Editing – The Retouch Menu provides creative freedom, without the need for a computer, offering 13 easy editing functions, including Trim, Red-eye Correction and Soft Filter.
    • Nikon EXPEED Image Processing – Assures breathtakingly rich image quality, managing color, contrast, exposure, noise and speed.
    • Automatic Image Sensor Cleaning – Ultrasonic process and exclusive Airflow Control combats the accumulation of dust in front of the image sensor, safeguarding image quality shot after shot.
    • 11-point Autofocus – Fast and accurate autofocus delivers razor-sharp pictures.
    • Active D-Lighting – Restores picture-enhancing detail in shadows and highlights.

    The D3000 packs all the innovation and enhanced engineering into a light, compact body. Its leading-edge technology resides behind a user-friendly interface that makes it extraordinarily simple to take the kinds of photos you’ve always wanted to take.

  • Grab The Pentax K-X 12.4 Megapixel Digital Camera With 18-55mm Lens

    Posted on May 5th, 2010 Staff Writer

    The Pentax Kx is a 12.4-megapixel camera is a great camera with sensor-shift image stabilization, a 2.7-inch LCD, Live View mode, and a 720p movie mode. Capable of 4.6 frames per second, the Pentax K-x’s top shutter speed is 1/6,000 second. The Pentax K-x also includes the K-7′s HDR modes, and it also has the Digital filters, as well as a new Cross Process mode that randomly emulates several results that you’d only get by cross-processing film with different types of developer. Though it’s small, the Pentax K-x’s grip is good, with an ample thumbgrip on the back. The Mode dial now includes Movie mode as well. This is a great buy as far as a SLR camera goes and is very affordable for all the features that come with the camera.

    Other Specifications

    SENSOR

    * Type: CMOS with primary color filter and integrated Shake/Dust Reduction sensor-movement system
    * Size: 23.6 x 15.8mm
    * Color depth: 8 bits/channel JPG, 12 bits/channel RAW
    * Effective pixels: 12.4 MP
    * Total pixels: 12.9 MP
    * Recorded resolutions
    o Still: 12M (4288×2848), 10M (3936×2624), 6M (3072×2048), 2M (1728×1152)
    o Movie (resolution/FPS): 1280x720p24 (16:9), 640x416p24 (3:2)
    * Quality levels: Best, Better, Good
    * Dust Removal: Image sensor movement combined with SP coating (Dust Alert available)

    LENS MOUNT

    * Type/construction: PENTAX KAF2 bayonet stainless steel mount
    * Usable lenses: PENTAX KAF3, KAF2, KAF, KA (K mount, 35mm screwmount, 645/67 med format lenses useable w adapter and/or restrictions)
    * SDM function: Yes
    * Power zoom function: n/a

    FOCUS SYSTEM

    * Type: TTL phase-matching 11 point (9 cross) wide autofocus system (SAFOX VIII)
    * Focus modes: AF Auto, AF Single (w focus lock), AF Continuous (available in Action mode including Auto Picture Action, Kids, Pet, Stage Lighting, Night Snap, P/A/S/M/B/Sv), Manual
    * Focus point adjustment: 11 point auto, 5 point auto, AF point select, center/spot
    * AF assist: Yes, via built-in flash

    VIEWFINDER

    * Type: Pentamirror
    * Coverage (field of view): Approx 96%
    * Magnification: Approx 0.85X (w 50mm F1.4 at infinity)
    * Standard focusing screen: Natural-Bright-Matte II
    * Diopter adjustment: -2.5 to 1.5
    * Depth of field preview: Optical & Digital (available via programmable Green button)

    This item also includes the following

    K-x Black

    18-55mm Lens

    Software CD-ROM S-SW99

    USB Cable I-USB7

    Strap O-ST53

    Hotshoe Cover FK

    Eyecup FQ

    Body Mount Cover

    AA Lithium Batteries (*4)

    We hope you get a chance to try this camera out. We think you will be as impressed as we were.

  • Olympus Tough-8010 14.0 Megapixel Digital Camera is a great buy

    Posted on April 29th, 2010 Staff Writer

    Olympus Tough-8010 14.0 Megapixel Digital Camera

    Olympus Stylus Tough cameras already are world-renowned for being shockproof, waterproof, crushproof and freezeproof powerhouses. These cameras not only endure more than any other cameras, they also capture images as vivid as the adventures you live. The Olympus Stylus Tough-8010 is a compact 14-Megapixel digital camera with a 28mm 5x optical zoom lens designed for people with an active lifestyle. The camera has features that allow you to capture the action even in low light. Dual Image Stabilization will keep your images sharp, and if the image is better captured in motion.

    Other Features

    - 14-megapixel effective recording
    - 2-11/16″ LCD screen
    - waterproof to 33 feet
    - freeze proof to 14°F
    - shockproof up to 6.6 feet

    Technical Details

    - Optical Sensor Resolution: 14 MP
    - Optical Sensor Technology: CCD
    - Optical zoom: 5 x
    - Maximum Aperture Range: F/3.5-5.1
    - Minimum focal length: 5 millimeters
    - Maximum focal length: 25 millimeters
    - Lens Type: Zoom lens
    - Optical Sensor Size: 1/2.3″
    - Included Flash Type: Built-in flash
    - Display Size: 2.7 inches
    - Light Sensitivity: ISO 100, ISO 800, ISO 400, ISO 200, ISO auto, ISO 64, ISO 1600
    - Image types: JPEG
    - Shooting Modes: Frame movie mode
    - Exposure Control Type: Cuisine, Candle, Beauty, Underwater macro, Snow, Underwater wide 2, Underwater wide 1, Documents, Landscape, Portrait mode, Underwater snapshot, Beach/snow, Night portrait, Self-portrait, Pet, Fireworks, Panorama assist, Night scene, Sports mode, Sunset, Indoor
    - Width: 3.9 inches
    - Depth: 0.9 inches
    - Height: 2.5 inches
    - Weight: 7.6 Ounces

    If you are looking for a great buy then look no further than the Olympus Stylus Tough-8010.

  • 42nd Street Photo’s Boating Photography Tips

    Posted on March 30th, 2010 Staff Writer

    Today we are going to talk about nautical photography or taking photos while on a boat. This can be any type of boat whether you are on a lake or in an ocean. Always keep the basics in mind that we have posted in our articles. Things like camera is accessible, camera is operational, lighting, focus, take plenty of photos, etc. With digital cameras being so affordable why not give it a shot.

    Well we hope you have a boat and if you do here are a few things to think about.

    Keep your horizon straight – Keep an eye on the horizon as you shoot, its easy to lose track of the way the boat is rolling.

    Shoot with fast shutter speeds – Due to the fact you are on a moving boat and you are shooting a moving boat this can cause blur and fuzziness in your photos. Turn up the shutter speed to 1/1000 or higher.

    Don’t shoot at mid-day – The best time for shooting is early morning and late afternoon. Overhead sun is harsh on boats and scenery.

    Look around alot – Keep looking around, you would be surprised what you just might come across that makes a good shot. A good trick to ensure a sharper shot is to track, or pan, the camera with the moving object, instead of trying to grab the action as it passes through the frame.

    Reflections – The sunlight that bounces from water can add a magical, reflective sparkle to the hull. Ask the captain or whoever is driving the boat to rotate the bow until it lights up.

    We hope this few tips help taking shots the next time you go boating.

  • 42nd Street Photo’s Beginner Photography Tips

    Posted on February 23rd, 2010 Staff Writer

    We are going to offer a few tips for the beginner photographer. This article is more for the people who want to get into photography and are just looking for the basics to get started.

    Start with an inexpensive camera. There is no use in spending a lot of money if you are just starting out. First buy an inexpensive camera and take plenty of photos to get the feel for what you are doing then you will know what to purchase next. I would suggest a point and shoot until you starting getting serious then move up to a SLR.

    Carry your camera at all times, photo opportunities came when you least expect them too. Most digital cameras are small enough to fit in a small carry bag and you can even add a tripod if you like. You might also find a location you want to come back back and take photos of if you don’t have your camera.

    User free resources to learn more about photography. Check out your local library and even the wealth of free information on the Internet.

    Play with your camera settings. Learn what each setting does and how to use it. Read the manual that comes with the camera and don’t be afraid to experiment with them.

    Take photos all the time and any time. Take photos everyday if possible to practice on a regular basis.

    We hope these help any beginners that are interested in photography.

  • 42nd Street Photo’s Photographing Sunrise and Sunset Tips

    Posted on December 26th, 2009 Staff Writer

    If you travel a lot during the holidays if might have the chance to see a beautiful sunrise or sunset in the location you are at. Here are a few things you might consider if you want to photograph these moments.

    If you do decide to have a go at taking a sunrise / sunset picture, then winter is probably the best time to start. Why? Because the nights are long and the days are short, which basically means, you don’t have to set off at a too late/early of an hour.

    - Do a web search to find the time of the sunrise or sunset.

    - Shoot at a variety of focal lengths

    - Set the ISO to 100 for the cleanest (little digital noise) possible photograph.

    - Frame the scene so that the horizon line is not in the center of the frame. Placing the horizon line near the top or bottom of the frame is more pleasing.

    - Remove any filters on the lens so as not to get a ghost image of the sun in the photograph.

    - Keep Shooting, a sunset or sunrise constantly changes over time and can produce great colors.

    - Include a silhouette, add some depth and perspective to your photos.

    - Carry a notebook and log any great locations you find.

    These are just a few tips and we hope they help you when shooting sunrises and sunsets.

  • Take a video tour of 42nd Street Photo

    Posted on December 21st, 2009 Staff Writer

    Check out our video tour of 42nd Street Photo and come by and visit us. We have everything you need from digital cameras to DVD camcorders.

  • 42nd Street Photo’s Tips On Choosing A Camera

    Posted on October 18th, 2009 Staff Writer

    The most important factor in photography is choosing a camera. Cameras usually fall into three categories: hobbyists, amateurs, and professionals. You might be taking pictures of your latest vacation or family during the holidays or maybe you are taking shots to build a portfolio. You will also want to consider quality and portability as cameras can range from large professional cameras to small portable cameras. Cameras can be broken down into groups which include ultra-compact, compact, hobbyist, and digital SLR. Most cameras will fall into the middle two categories.

    If you are looking for a camera only by the megapixel rating means you will miss out on the other features of the camera like accessories, portability, and a good quality flash, but is still one the most important considerations. Cameras that are less than 3 megapixels are good for basic snapshots. These cameras are good for your standard size pictures but the images won’t be as clear if you want anything bigger. Cameras that are between 3 and 5 megapixels are good for everyday use and vacation cameras. Cameras in the 5 to 10 megapixel range are usually more serious cameras for hobbyists. These images will take up more hard drive space but are perfect for printing out in larger sizes. Anything over 10 megapixels is overkill for casual use. If you are using a 10 megapixels camera then you are probably a professional and expect to be paid for your work.

    Zoom is another important consideration. There are two kinds of zoom, optical zoom and digital zoom. Optical zoom relies on the lens itself magnifying the light coming in so that what is distant appears larger and closer in the image. Digital zoom takes the resulting image and magnifies it after. Optical zoom usually produces better results.

    Another factor to look at when choosing a camera is storage media. Some camera manufacturers have proprietary storage systems that are icompatible with cameras of other makes. Commom formats are Compact Flash, Secure Digital cards, and Sony Memory stick. The storage sizes can range from smaller 8mb cards/sticks to larger 32GB cards/sticks. Prices are quite reasonable these days so the selection of larger sizes is quite affordable.

  • Shop 42nd Street Photo for Digital Camera Christmas Gifts

    Posted on October 31st, 2008 Elliot

    42nd Street Photo has been one of New York’s most trusted digital camera stores for over 40 years now. The biggest reasons to shop Christmas with us though, are our great prices! If you’re looking for a high quality digital camera that’s easy to use – be sure to look at the Casio EX-S10 . It’s on sale right now for $219.99! It will make a great gift for that loved one who’s looking to take better pictures.

    If your loved one has an interest in photography and wants the camera that does everything, they might want the Nikon D300. The D300 is one of Nikon’s top of the line 12.3 megapixel cameras. There are very few digital SLR’s on the market that capture stunning images like these. Visit our store for more Christmas bargains!

  • Relive every moment with Nikon D3

    Posted on July 29th, 2008 Elliot

    The Nikon D3 takes the standard of photography to the next level with its versatile features. News, fast action, events, or landscape, it is the perfect camera. The Nikon D3 is all about high-definition, with an HD output port and an HD 3.0″ display. It has the EXPEED image-processing system to capture the accurate color with the finest details. The advanced autofocus makes any amateur photographer to shoot like a pro, as it precisely tracks your subject movement to deliver a crystal clear image. Shooting in day or night, you are sure to be amazed by the startling picture quality.  

    The camera is compatible with a wide array of lenses that allows you to choose one depending on your requirements. With 9 fps continuous shooting speed, capture all those incredible memories into your camera. Its shutter unit is made of the premium materials, so its durability and performance cannot be questioned. Users will never be deprived of storage space, as the camera has dual memory card slot. This amazing piece of technology is encased in a magnesium alloy body with sealed buttons to assure reliable performance in any condition. The picture control setting saves your time, as you can optimize the image before capturing. The Nikon D3, a complete camera for both hobbyists and professionals, is now available at 42nd street photo.

  • Nikon D80 for every aspiring photographer

    Posted on July 28th, 2008 Elliot

    Nikon D80 is a great choice to all photographic enthusiasts out there. This user-friendly and easy-to-handle camera is bundled with features that amazed me the moment I tried it. With its instant start-up and immediate response, I didn’t have the chance of missing out fast moving subjects. Shooting at night is not a problem anymore with the Nikon N80. The camera features i-TTL flash control that calculates flash exposure to provide better automatic flash balance. An effective replacement for Nikon D70, this camera meets the demands of the photographic pro with its continuous shooting at up to 3 frames per second.   

    The in-camera editing option allows me to optimize the image as per my preference. This system helps in unleashing my creative side. The other fact that amuses me is its high-efficiency power system. It proves to be very useful while planning an outdoor shoot. After every single recharge, the camera can be used to take up to 2,700 images. Composing and viewing of images is made easy with the 2.5″ LCD color monitor with 170-degree, wide-angle viewing. Check for more information on the Nikon D80 Digital SLR Camera at 42nd Street Photo.